Documento sin título
About
TRANS>Magazine
Projects
Arts Editions
Area
News
Telesymposium
Upcoming
 
 
Nro Volumen: #8, 2000
ISSN: 1-467832-48-8
ISBN: 1-888209-09-7
Editorial
Masthead
Collaborators
 
 

Trans>Magazine-->Archives-->TRANS>8

 
 
Projects Sites
 Critical Trance On Films TRANS>8
On the Museum as Film Décor | Sobre el museo como cine décor: Marcel Broodthaers and | y La Bataille de Waterloo
by por Eric de Bruyn
Hélio Oiticica and cinema's de-realized image | e a imagem desrealizada do cinema
by por Claudio Da Costa
Luminist Suprematism | Suprematismo Lumínico
by por Karen Schneider
Jonas Mekas and Peter Kubelka: A Diary | Jonas Mekas y Peter Kubelka: Un Diario
by por Jonas Mekas
 Cultural Conditioning TRANS>8
A conversation between Hubert Damisch and Hans-Ulrich Obrist/une conversation entre Hubert Damish and et Hans-Ulrich Obrist
by Hubert Damisch and Hans-Ulrich Obrist
Life, Interrupted/Vida interrumpida
by by/por Dominic Molon
Something Between the Two/Algo entre los dos
by by/por Jeremy Millar
ARTE/CIDADE: Interventions in Megacities | Intervenções em Megacidades
by by/por Nelson Brissac
The performer is in all of us. Living Interdisciplinarity | El actor vive en todos nosotros. Vivir lo interdisiplinario.
by por Jens Hoffmann
Afterthoughts on Dissin’ the Real/ Pensamientos Posteriores sobre Dissin’ the Real
by by/por Maia Damianovic
A conversation between Johannes Cladders and Hans-Ulrich Obrist/ Una conversación entre Johannes Cladders y Hans-Ulrich Obrist
by by/von Hans-Ulrich Obrist
 Editorial TRANS>8
TRANS>
by Sandra Anterlo-Suarez
 La Oficina TRANS>8
Headlands
by Lee Mingwei
Tokyo Santa, 1996
by Paul McCarthy
Mejor Vida Corp.
by Minerva Cuevas
 Disker TRANS>8
Ruth Benzacar 1932-2000
by Adriano Pedrosa
 Project Room TRANS>8
Franklin Cassaro. Introduction | Introducão
by por Ernesto Neto
Telesymposium
   
LABORATORIUM IS THE ANSWER, WHAT IS THE QUESTION? by|por Barbara Vanderlinder and|e Hans-Ulrich Obrist

Introduction by Adriano Pedrosa

It’s difficult to clearly and precisely define Laboratorium. In the beginning of the summer of 1999, I received its small and dense Program Book in the mail, which included information on its various activities and events. Was this an exhibition, a symposium, a series of workshops, performances, public experiments? The Program Book announced Laboratorium as an “interdisciplinary project” curated by Hans-Ulrich Obrist and Barbara Vanderlinden, a co-production between Antwerpen Open, Roomade and the Provinciaal Museum voor Fotografie, in the context of a program that celebrated the 400th birthday of Anthony van Dyck. Was this about art?

It is useful to recall a few of Laboratorium's more than 60 “participants” to have an idea of the scope and variety of the project. These included figures such as Francisco Varela, director of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique; Isabelle Stengers, Professor of Philosophy at the Université Libre de Bruxelles; Luc Steels, director of the Sony Computer Laboratory in Paris; Bruno Latour, Professor of the Centre de Sociologie de l’Innovation at the École Nationale Supérieure de Mines de Paris; American choreographer Meg Stuart; Toronto-based designer Bruce Mau; German filmmaker Harun Farocki; Dutch architect Rem Koolhaas; as well as artists such as Panamarenko, Matt Mullican, Tomoko Takahashi, Oladélé Bamgboyé, Joseph Grigely, Carsten Höller, and the Dakar-based group Laboratoire Agit-Art.

I would be in Europe that summer and thus planned to be in Antwerp to look at the project. Yet when was the most appropriate time to be there? The project had not only been dispersed throughout the city, but also over the summer, and continued until October 3. The Laboratorium office suggested that I be there during the weekend of the June 27. I’d buy the catalog as soon as I got there, I thought, and after leafing through it at night at the hotel, all would become clear. Yet as I got to Antwerp, I found no catalog, only a strange Book Machine, whose pages were produced copiously at Bruce Mau’s office in Toronto and pasted daily onto the walls of the Museum of Photography in Antwerp.

So what was Laboratorium all about? The project’s questions revolved around the concept and practice of and in the laboratory—what is a laboratory? What is an experiment? What is the status of each? How do they come about and change? What is their relationship with the public? With art? What is the relationship between the studio and the laboratory? Between scientific, speculative and artistic practices? Yet Laboratorium also raised new questions about that all too familiar object: the exhibition. Obrist and Vanderlinden have become known as curators who persistently challenge the limits and possibilities of exhibition-making. It is not so much that their projects are formal incursions into and plays with the exhibition genre, but rather that they have found new ways to exhibit, question and speak about contemporary art far beyond the white cube’s walls. One of the most relevant aspects of projects such as Obrist and Vanderlinden’s is how exhibition, discussions, conferences, symposia, publications and other means, sites and media are articulated in innovative and stimulating ways. Laboratorium is a fine example in that sense, and is already becoming an important reference for those who are seriously considering the practice and reflection of exhibition-making. The experimental nature of the project (both in formal and thematic ways) links its central motif to the very medium it makes use of—the exhibition as a laboratory.

Here we reproduce fragments from discussion sessions held in preparation to Laboratorium, in Antwerp in October, and in Paris in November 1998. The participants are the project's two curators, and three of their closest collaborators: Bruno Latour, Carsten Höller and Luc Steels. These brainstorming sessions show how the laboratory is a key notion to the project in terms of content, site, and form. Through this Telesymposium, brainstorming sessions are rendered public much like Laboratorium itself and its “Open Laboratory Days.” In Vanderlinden’s terms:

"While making this public, we hope to provide a better insight into the exhibition per se and recognize the urgency of situating the debate both centered on and fostered by exhibitions. We also believe that these discussions provide an insight into that which usually remains outside of the exhibition, and thus make some of the processes involved more palpable. It is unfeasible to reconstitute everything that has been said. Therefore we choose to publish fragments with statements by those who have contributed a great deal to the concept of Laboratorium."

A special section, at the end of this Telesymposium, is dedicated to Bruce Mau’s Book Machine. Here we reproduce the designer’s guidelines and concepts for his contribution. Once again, another much familiar object is being thoroughly questioned and pushed beyond its limits—the exhibition catalog. The final version of it, an edit of the hundreds of pages output in the summer of 1999 in Toronto and Antwerp, is due this fall from Dumont. I look forward to receiving it and leafing through it at night at the hotel. All will then become clear.

Adriano Pedrosa

Laboratorium is the answer, what is the question?


< Discussion held at Royal Museum of Fine Arts, 8 October 1998, Antwerp >

Barbara Vanderlinden (BV): In order to continue I will begin by summarizing what has been said this morning. We spoke of the complexities involved in the processes of creative production and of the possibilities of our project to provide a series of overtures to the way experimental research is set up by artists and scientists. Because of the heterogeneous mixing involved, we had chosen the “laboratory” and the “studio” to give unity to this investigation. Instead of looking to the finished products, we would like to focus on the “cooking steps” that mediate between, and show a more sophisticated view, where science and art may be seen through constant transformations. Instead of trying to get the meaning of a work directly, we would like to gain understanding through looking at its dynamic transformations. As a model for this exhibition or investigation, we established a core group, which functions as a preparatory body that allows us to investigate the model of such an exhibition with specialists from different fields of art and science. This first step, the discussions, in some way constitutes the invisible part of the project. The second element, or public component of the project, would include real laboratories . . . existing laboratories in the city of Antwerp, and laboratories or experiments set up on the occasion of the project. We would like to invite practitioners from various fields to set up such a laboratory. Some have already been contacted. Another possibility would be a series of demonstrations or tabletop experiments as conceived by Bruno Latour. Another possibility would be some sort of information lab, which would include all the research material. This could unveil the project in a very different way and incorporate the so-called “wastebasket” of the exhibition, not only including the files, computers, etc., but also the literature used during our research. While scanning through this, the public could find out about the laboratory concept in the context of literature, theater, performance . . . and other disciplines. Architecture is an interesting perspective, too.

Bruno Latour (BL): There's a large bibliography on architecture and laboratories . . .

BV: Yes, so we could investigate the architectural spaces in which artists and scientists work. As the science historian Peter Galison and art historian Caroline Jones suggest in their recent publication, the meaning of all these places is more site-specific than generally acknowledged. They observe a shift in the architecture of the spaces used for laboratories and studios, from domestic-like structures to commercial and industrial buildings. Along with this we could investigate its relationship to the exhibition spaces, where we see a recent emphasis placed on process rather than the product in the presentation . . .

Hans-Ulrich Obrist (HUO): There's also the interesting idea of the ready-made-labs. When we went to see the Laboratory of Hydraulic Research in Antwerp, where researchers study the influence of waves and currents on seaports, we were totally excited about the beauty of its maquettes and scaled-down seaports. So we thought some of these real laboratories could be shown, just the way they are, and could be accessible during the exhibition, not during the whole period but during certain days or hours. Which leads us to a very important issue: the timing, not only of the laboratories but also of the exhibition. What does it mean that the exhibition goes on for several months? Some things could be shown only for a few seconds. The Talking Head experiment of Luc Steels will go on throughout the exhibition; other things could be very short. So, certain laboratories could be open once a week, or a few hours a day. Maybe we can manage to have them open for the opening of the exhibition. On one hand we have the labs in the city, and on the other hand, we could make a kind of map with laboratories outside of Antwerp, like those in Paris and London. When we spoke to Bruno, the idea came of a geographical map with laboratories. This could be included in the catalogue. This brings us also to the last and very important point of the catalogue, something that we have to discuss this afternoon. We'd like to have your input on this subject, too.

BL: Are we brainstorming? I was thinking of what you said this morning about the industry. What is really interesting in terms of a scale-model is scale modeling here. But the opposite is a very important part of the industry, and that is scaling-up. The question of doing prototypes, for example for a big chemistry factory. It's a key point for the industry itself. How big should the scale-model be to detect a defect on scale 1? It is a nightmare, because the bigger it is, the more it costs. When it is not well designed, it doesn't give you any new information on what will happen on scale 1. There are a number of little devices for this that are scale-modeled. There exists a whole industry of scale modeling for chemistry. It resembles toys; you cannot do it on the computer.

Carsten Höller (CH): And that is of course if you like the basic idea of the laboratory. It is the scaling-down of the outside world that we have to represent on a smaller scale, inside the laboratory. Therefore, sometimes you have to exclude some factors, in order to understand other factors better, and at the same time, to have better access. This could also be the basic starting point for the exhibition. I still have problems with the term “exhibition”—it could be a show, a representation of different things . . .

BV: Or a program of activities, organized on the basis of a time schedule, rather than the floor plan of an exhibition.

CH: For the choice to be made of what is finally shown, or made accessible, this could be a basic, common line in the projects. That is the idea of developing something, an evolving system, and a work in progress. That is of course a very bad term, a dynamic system. All these things could have in common that they have an evolutionary side. That I find quite interesting, because then the dynamic shows itself in the different stages of development, not when the sculptures are already made, the paintings painted and hanging on the wall.

LS: Because we are all very busy, I'd like to know how we are going to proceed on the project, and how much time we will spend... So, therefore, we need a time schedule.

BL: I thought this was a brainstorm, but it’s a cold shower!

BV: These are very important things, but maybe they can be discussed later. We still have some time left, a bit more than usual, since exhibitions are prepared over a short period of time, compared to the work being done in other disciplines; yet we realize it's not so much time.

HUO: That is why we have opted not to have too many projects. The show, the project, the work in progress can have different layers.

CH: But “work in progress” is a highly stigmatized term.

BL: Could you tell me why it has such a bad connotation in art history?

BV: It has a very negative connotation, because it became too aestheticizing for something that was not meant to be a genre in terms of aesthetics.

BL: So the word “laboratory” is still untouched, untouched by science.

CH: At least it is neutral.

< Pause >

BL: I was brought here by Hans and Barbara, on the condition that I would not work but only give ideas, and you have already a whole construction in mind . . .

LS: But my role is different—I have a double role. Concerning the time schedule, I'm in the same position; I can't do a lot of practical things.

BL: I think of something that can be brought in (and in my view we are still brainstorming). It is about Adam Lowe. He has conducted this extremely interesting research about digital prints and has something called the Museum of Prints. It's an exhibition that exists and has been shown only a few times, which is the same sort of thing as a laboratory. There's a display of thirty different processes of the same image by a digital print system that exists on the market. It is a very striking exhibition. You see on the thirty images the differences between all the printing processes. In terms of information, they are all the same, and yet once they are printed, they are entirely different. It is striking and yet it is a simple thing to bring here. It has exactly the same spirit as the laboratory, but now you have a print laboratory. You have a print on the screen and what happens when you put it on paper.

LS: This certainly exists at the laboratories of the Belgium photo company Agva-Gevaert. I know they have research groups in the digital area.

BV: And that could be linked to the Photography Museum, which has shown a great deal of interest in coproducing this project.

BL: We are in the cold shower and brainstorming at the same time? I wanted to know if Van Dyck was interested in four-color printing?

HUO: Yes, I think those are the two things. On one hand, we have this brainstorming as a core, a think tank of the exhibition, where we gain advice and ideas. Being an adviser doesn't imply working. It rather means giving ideas and making connections with other people. Concerning the production, from the beginning we said we would only take on a few productions, and these will be fully produced in Antwerp. As Luc described his project, there might be a lot of technological things that we will be unable to produce, and in this sense it is a collaboratorium. But as an adviser, which counts for Bruno Latour with the Tabletop Experiment . . .

BL: Could you first remind me what that idea was?

HUO: Yes, you actually pointed out that it could be nice to do some Tabletop Experiments during a week, or a day, like the one you did in Paris. The idea was to have scientists doing their own simple experiment in front of an audience. For the opening week, for the opening days, say two or three days, there could be about twenty or thirty scientists conducting their experiment.

BV: We also thought of publishing a book on this subject.

HUO: Exactly, a book with kind of do-it-yourself experiments. Not only scientists but also artists would make Tabletop Experiments. It is, of course, completely dependent on your time schedule. One possibility could be that you, as part of your adviser's role, provide names of interesting scientists; another part could be that you would orchestrate Tabletop Experiments yourself.

BL: I think we should not mix up the two tones of the discussion. It's too complicated if we become practical too fast, and also I'm French, so I always have some difficulty with becoming practical . . . To come back to the public experiments, what could be interesting would be workshops, a “work package,” as teachers call it. It could be something like dioxin or breast cancer, or whatever might be an issue for the people in Antwerp, and then inviting the specialists who are vocal about the controversy. There are thousands of these issues in the field of health care. And then—this is a bit tricky—posing the question, Why can't there be a conversion? What sort of thing can be publicly shown on the difficulty of reaching an agreement? Why is it difficult? Is it because of the statistics, the laboratory experiment? Is it because we lack numbers?

BV: There is a very interesting research institute here in Antwerp, called the Tropical Institute. It deals with health issues such as the sleeping disease and aids.

LS: Or in the lab that does quality testing of water, air... the degree of pollution.

BL: But we are interested in showing the process. There is, however a difficulty with this in a lot of countries, such as Switzerland. What is public science? So, the workshop is not about finding a solution, but about mentioning the problem. As for breast cancer, there might be some doctor in one of the Antwerp hospitals who says it is too technical...

LS: When you do such a thing, it is also important to look at the legal impact, because the real issue is that pharmaceutical companies or doctors who make the wrong diagnosis are sued. So it is not a theoretical discussion. The people who make decisions are confronted with this who-to-believe thing, they have to make judgements, and, finally, they are judged for the decisions they have made. So, it is not only the fact that specialists argue, but also that society is requesting the scientific community to make strict judgements.

BL: We don't get strict judgements, we get divided judgements.

LS: But the doctor who has made a so-called mistake is being prosecuted. Is it fair to judge, given the fact that there are different points of view? So, the role of science . . .

HUO: Is it about limited and unlimited responsibility?

LS: Yes, and the expectations of the public with respect to science.

BL: If you want to bring people to your exhibition, I think health can be a very good starting point, because these days, you have people who go to physicians with the lancets in their hands. That interests everyone. If you say fifteen projects, does each one have to bring their laboratory in? There could be one start from a certain public concern. One that takes it in reverse and starts from something that might lead to a laboratory. If we should screen breast cancer, you get a controversy. Before, people imagined that when you go to the scientists, you got a conversion, but now you make diversion. Everyone has a story to tell. The question is how many laboratories should we bring in view to inform the public about why it is so difficult to converge. Sometimes it is the statistics, or the fight between disciplines when something stands between two disciplines. That could be one way of questioning the laboratory, through public concerns. It would be interesting to probe that concern by having people who come and discuss the issues.

LS: I think this brings out something that is not on your list. The way science operates is, of course, not only in labs, but also in the workshop. I think it would be very interesting to organize a few workshops as places where people confront their ideas. And that the results of the discussion are visible. In this kind of exhibition the origin of the ideas comes to the foreground.

BV: The very notion of result would be something that is conceived in a different way through art and science. If you take, for example, the American artist Joseph Grigely, who has a sort of language lab...

HUO: Has anyone seen this in Manifesta in Rotterdam? The idea was basically for two weeks Grigely was in Rotterdam. It was a process, growing for two weeks, like a complex dynamic system in relation to the city's complex dynamic system. This idea of process is very interesting: you can have different stages, and also the idea of interiority and exteriority. The problem with workshops is to what degree the public is able to participate and whether they are public or not. It is like in a debate—the essential thing often happens in-between, in the bus or during the coffee break.

CH: I think the idea of breast cancer has two disadvantages. First, it's not everybody's concern, and, also, it is quite tragic. The phenomenon of the hangover is more interesting as a disease. If you see how little research is done on the hangover. It is very common. I recently read an article about it, which described how three researchers all ended up with different ideas, so nobody knows anything. It comes to the point of self-experimentation the next morning, because you want to get rid of it. You drink another beer, or something else.

BL: Drug addiction could also be an interesting thing, but hangover is a bit bizarre.

CH: Not everyone has a drug addiction, but most people know hangovers from personal experience.

BL: I only drink my wine so . . .

CH: Few people drink and never have a hangover; it's very different and there's no general rule for how to treat a hangover. It could be a good starting point for a laboratory to see how it can be treated, what it is, how it can be explained in a scientific way .

LS: And people will come to the laboratory with a hangover . . .

BV: It's a funny topic but there is no big taboo surrounding it, so, how can it generate public concern?

CH: What's funny is not something you should take out of consideration.

BL: If we imagine fifteen ways of handling the interest of the public in laboratories, each one should be very different. One of them is curiosity. I was thinking of something that really worries the people in Antwerp. How long do you have to wait before we bring a laboratory in that can provoke a dispute and therefore educate the general audience? There are a lot of entrances, ways to approach the subject of the laboratory, as we saw in the discussion so far. The people in Antwerp are not interested now, but they will be once they will have seen the exhibition. The other thing is the Tabletop Experiments. It's not so much about scientists giving lectures. We don't want to bring you science of things that have been observed somewhere else, but we want to see this phenomenon in the very room. It can fail and it can not be so spectacular, or it cannot fail and be very spectacular, and how do we need to interpret. What we ask you to do is, to show the difficulty of bringing it here. I did that with the philosopher of science Simon Schaeffer on Newton with four hundred people in Paris. It was very extraordinary. It was the prism experiment by Newton. With four hundred you couldn't do it on the prism. So the prism was relayed by a camera, except that this changed the color. The color was so bad that the people actually saw nothing. So, the question is what did these people witness in the seventeenth century? Why didn't we witness the same thing in Paris? It is to turn the question of transporting the laboratory into a topic. How transportable is it? It is a very difficult matter. It's like the health centers that take so much care of hygiene versus pollution. You can't actually transport the experiment without losing the accuracy and most of the information. Scientists on television are pointing at slides but don't get the phenomenon they are talking about. Ilya Prigogine has a nice answer to this, as well as, Bernard Self; it is a kind of flip-flopping. It's a very simple experiment.

LS: This is related to the psychology of perception and the visual illusion. There are additional ideas I want to throw on the table. One is the experiment with animals. There is a kind of terrorist group here in Flanders, called the Animal Liberation Front. They blow up McDonald’s restaurants, and so on. Two times in my life I was shocked by visiting a lab. The first time, brain experiments were being done on monkeys. The other time was in a nuclear physics lab, when there was a kind of little nuclear explosion, and the whole building started shaking. But in terms of animals, biologists often treat animals as material.

CH: Once I saw an experiment in which they put a mouse in a cupboard, and when they took it out it had cancer.

LS: If you get this in an exhibition, people will be very shocked.

CH: Yes, but then we come back to the aesthetization of the lab. That is a bit dangerous, especially in the artistic context. Of course there is a fascination with how a laboratory looks like, with all the bottles and strange machines, which produce an uncanny effect. At the same time, I think it's just a form of appropriation, and it’s not yielding any further result. This subject matter should be treated with a lot of care. Especially when you talk about photographs taken in a laboratory. There's nothing wrong, as long as they serve as documentation.

BL: We could do something with pigs like you did together with Rosemarie Trockel at Documenta X. The general aesthetic of a laboratory is not to terrify people with mad scientists stories. That is a modernist idiom of terrorization. We want, on the contrary, a process that is complicated, difficult, and that interests the public without the terror or being pedagogic. There are a lot of experiments in the field of animal behavior, when you have the device, a very clever trick to know what the animals want. Like, how much light would a pig choose if it had the choice? There are tricks to find this out. It is easy with pigs because a pig is quite intelligent, but with poultry and other farm animals...

CH: But they usually look at how many eggs a chicken lays in different kinds of light.

BL: That might exist around here. And they are very striking; it is quite clever research. But of course you never know what the parameters of the animals are. That's how they detected that chickens prefer less crowded living conditions. I'm just brainstorming in case there is a big poultry industry around here.

CH: I could provide you with three hormonally treated pigs, which could be slaughtered and eaten, hormones and all, and then we could wait and see what would happen. In Belgium, in general, there is a lot to do about hormones.

BL: That's even better than breast cancer.

LS: Experiments with animals are something that concerns people. It's a very controversial thing.

BL: Yes, this is another possibility to generate a discussion—the inside and the outside of the laboratory. It was a private place in a mansion, without any connection to the outside world, until, in the seventeenth century, some well-educated people were allowed in. Today, the outside becomes more and more an issue. Where is the outside? It is true in medicine, with hormones, where everyone participates in the experiment, also in genetic engineering. This is the idea of the whole earth inside a lab.

BV: It's like experiments that involve the entire globe. The fact that the laboratory is not the laboratory anymore. There is this particle device where the earth itself becomes an instrument.

BL: That's a very nice one, which could be another entry.

BV: Large-scale experiments, or out-of-scale experiments involving laboratories, such as the Superconducting Supercollider (SSC), the so-called "billion dollar detector" in the nineties that sat a mile underground in Texas. Although this laboratory was never built, it is symptomatic of how contemporary science projects impossible instruments and laboratories. SSC showed how collaboration, budgetary expenditure, political commitment, and brute square mileage could get out of scale. The SSC project led to strong debates in the US congress. It was projected that it would cost billions, an amount large enough become an international issue. In a discussion with a Jean-Paul Van Bendegem, who is a professor at the philosophy department of the VUB in Brussels, he brought up another example of an experiment done in outer space. I don't remember the details of what he said, but he was concerned with some of the scientific developments that lead to impossible or the impossibility of laboratories, when experiments can not be done because the necessary instruments go beyond the conditions of our real world. So, another entry to the question of our project could be the impossible laboratory . . .

BL: That's a very good idea because it is one of the big issues in physics. Lots of my physicist friends are worried. They say, “In a few years we will teach physics like Latin.” There's no experimental basis thinkable. The smallest experiments require taking one galaxy and bringing it in collision with another one. A lot of my friends say that their students are again becoming more and more speculative mathematicians because there's no experimental basis anymore. Another interesting thing is to take the earth as an instrument, which is done in radio astronomy, if you take one in Munich, one in London and another in America. You can actually consider these three as a cross-section of a huge telescope, a radio telescope that now has the size of half the earth. The instrument is not exactly the same concept as the lab, but it's a very rich concept.

HUO: It has something to do with the whole notion of the unrealized projects, unbuilt roads in terms of inventions, which do not matter at the time they are made. A couple of years ago, Bruce Sterling looked at the whole history of technology, and demonstrated that the Internet was actually invented in the early twentieth century, somewhere in Hungary etc., but it was only actualized recently. So this also has something to do with the unrealized.

BV: We are mixing up two things.

BL: We are mixing up more than two things. On one hand, there is the expansion in sizing, on the other hand, the expansion from private to public. What I’d like to ask Hans and Barbara is, whether there is a link with the art world, because many of the same questions show up in the art world. What is art? What is it that artists make projects in which they want the public to participate? Is the art world becoming unreal? Do you intend to address these issues in this project?

< Continuing the discussion, 8 October 1998, Museum of Fine Arts, Antwerp >

HUO: What is important to us is not to have an artist, but to have different kinds of laboratories that are not about the representation of the laboratory, but which really work. There have been quite a lot of exhibitions this year about representation of laboratories, from the artistic point of view, with a lot of artists. You have all these artworks which are about laboratory, which illustrate labs. This project should not so much consider representation but it has to be more performative, with an evolutionary side, as Carsten described it, the process of the laboratory in time.

BV: But do you think it is interesting for the public to participate in it, even if it is a project without framing it as an exhibition?

BL: This might be one of the fifteen entries. I think it can be useful if we had fifteen entries. It should capture and not make the public bored with things they've already seen.

HUO: The Slovenian artist Marco Peljhan created a Macrolab in Documenta X. It took place in the middle of a large-scale exhibition, but at the same time, it was a place for research far away from the actual exhibition. I think we should play upon this exteriority and interiority of the laboratory in all the fifteen projects. There could also be mixed forms, hybrids.

BV: Since part of this brainstorm is about getting practical, I will quickly mention that, somewhere around November, we should have a first shortlist for the laboratories we will be working with. We will definitely include the information from our brainstorming sessions to set up some criteria for selection.

HUO: There are about thirty-five laboratories we are going to check out in the next weeks.

BL: What about scale-modeling in art?

BV: Indeed, there are quite a lot of artists dealing with scale models, for example, artists who work with architectural models. I don't exactly know if it's this what you mean?

BL: What about falsification, the possibility of failure? Does it work in art?

CH: In art, you can't fail. That's an interesting question. You can't fail because there is no objectivity involved, and therefore no failure—there is no test that can be done to see if it is a failure or not. It works outside our structure, in the sense that, here, it is important to see how many people have seen the artwork, talked about it, written about it. Art cannot be falsified in the strictly scientific sense. Say there is an object of art that cannot be falsified by another instance. This is a completely different structure than in science, but it shows how common the idea of falsification is in science.

BL: It is a big discussion.

LS: I think it's a bit old-fashioned to think about a fixed truth and falsification.

BL: I was not talking about falsification but about failing. Will you exhibit a failure? That is my question. That is important to distinguish what you're doing from pedagogy, because you're not supposed to fail when you're "pedagogizing."

CH: In art, this cannot be the case because when and if you say this is a failure then...

BL: People applaud. This is what happened when I did this Pasteur experiment. A bottle slipped from my hands and fell on the ground, then I failed, and the public applauded.

LS: I think the interesting thing is that you can do experiments such as with robots and then there is the whole interpretation that is constructed around these experiments.

CH: Yes, that is part of the process.

LS: I think even if the person who designed the experiment says, "Look, I've just given the proof," well, even then it's not a clear-cut result.


< Fragments taken from a discussion held at Sony Laboratory, 14 November 1998, Paris >

Bruno Latour: Each interrogation and even each presentation of the subject in terms of art and science is doomed to fail. Because one will see the results, what we have defined as the enemy, that is, an image of fractals and an installation, and one will aestheticize both. So, starting from the moment we speak about the laboratory, laboratorium—the Latin may even be interesting—we speak about a process. Therefore, it is more of a challenge proposed to the artists: Are you, instead of doing over and over again the same things that you do in your studios and in your exhibitions, capable of practicing, in public, the production of a fact or an element, an effect, a fact? Fact and effect are used both in science and in art, therefore there is no discrimination. If you are not capable, we are not interested in you. I don't think, though, that we can address people as an artist or a scientist. And that works equally well for the laboratories we have mentioned: Is it possible to displace the laboratorium of Antwerp, the bonobos, from the zoo in a way that is interesting as well as public, or do we have to bring the public to the zoo? I don't know. Is the coast laboratory capable of presenting itself publicly? Without that, we will obtain results, as with the Tabletop Experiments. The great scientists will send slides to an ignorant public, explaining what they do and that that is great. And that is uninteresting.
Another aspect that seems interesting to me is the form of approach one has up until now, which is indeed rather special. Normally, the laboratory doesn’t come first, and then the things you do in the laboratory. First come the things you do, the experiments you do with something you want to know. You create a specific situation and later you use the laboratory as a place that helps, but that is really secondary. Here, however, the laboratory is something primary, which later gets filled in a certain way. It is also interesting to consider the laboratory here as a sort of double laboratory. This double laboratory in itself is also a form of laboratory, which examines itself in an analytical way, a laboratory of a laboratory. It is important to find a kind of connection between all these projects. Therefore, the approach one makes, an experiment, becomes our primary goal, and that is, to fill this laboratory with experiments to do. The thing to try is to find a way to produce something together that is neither art nor science, but that has a common interest, which makes us produce this thing.
These processes are important—because starting from the moment one speaks about the laboratory, one speaks about process. One first speaks about the laboratory and not about an element in particular. What Carsten Höller says is very important. It is also saying, “We will find a form of public presentation of elements that were private until now.” Not everybody does public openings as Luc Steels does. Normally, in the laboratory, one hides the mistakes one makes, and presents the results. This closed aspect is also valid for the studio. From the beginning of the eighteenth century, the laboratory has been a private place, even if "officially" it has been publicly financed. The original decision to code the entire operation as laboratorium is, as I see it, to try to find again a connection between public space and private space. Therefore, this space is relatively dangerous. You find yourself in some way, in the kitchen of the laboratory. Luc's experiment might fail, or it is possible that the Talking Heads might not be able to walk. We have to accept these risks. Just as Luc Steels' experiments might possibly fail. The only time I have been to Documenta the pigs . . . were on strike, I didn't see them; it was closed to the public. That's as far as the laboratory process is concerned. It implies reopening a private public discussion. If we are interested in the laboratory again, it is also because we want our time to open up, instead of a time of exasperated scientism. We want to understand how the laboratory happens, and add our critical observations. As we could read in Le Monde, they started breeding cows that are mixtures of cows and humans, in order to obtain human organs. We might even be ready to accept this—there is a very important moral point there. Still, we would like to know how these hybrids come about. It would be a pity to miss out on the times, which is to say, to make a high-tech, hypermodern or postmodern exhibition. We are already in another time, that of recuperation, let's say political reappropriation (in the very large sense of the term, political, and not necessarily dramatic. I have already quoted the examples of the port of Antwerp, breast cancer or contaminated soy, or the climate of Buenos Aires. That is more the feeling of the time. We would have a huge delay if we simply compared the effects; now it is about reappropriating questions one can no longer accept in the pedagogic relation. We no longer relate to science in a pedagogic way. In this sense, the exhibition "L'âme et le corps" is still a pedagogic exhibition. If there is no longer a pedagogic relation, what does that change in the setup? Coding "laboratorium" is very good, as one says, "We are not trying to teach you things you already know. In Luc's case, for instance, we ask that you come and look over the shoulders of specialists when they conduct experiments that might fail." This is not the same connection as saying, " You are one in the laboratory, you made all the mistakes and now we show them in the most fun and charming way."

Luc Steels: From the scientific side, I would like to say that some very important points were raised last time. First, there is the idea of experiment, the idea of laboratorium that needs to be communicated to people. I don't mean explicit communication, but by the experiment itself. By asking the question: "Why is an experiment done," one creates a reality, one asks questions, and so on. This means that there is a certain type of scientific activity one has, because there are a lot of people who make models, who don't make experiments, who don't have laboratories. It is very important to find experiments. Besides, all the fields of science don't have to be represented. If there are six, that's a lot.
Bruno's book and Isabelle Stengers' book are very clear in the description of Pasteur's experiments. What is also very important, as Carsten Höller said, is why we do this in public: does one do it watching with fish eyes, like this, or is there an interaction? The goal for us is, on one hand, to make an experiment, but also to see at what point people react. Which means that we will introduce a lot more interactivity into the experiment, and afterward we will ask people whether cognitive phenomena have occurred. For us, it is not only about taking this and putting it in an exhibition. There is a public; there is an entire interaction, and at the end of the three months, scientific papers will be published about man's interactions with these entities.

Bruno Latour: It is the first time that the public-private relation will be rearticulated in a form that varies from the one found in the Palais de la Découverte, to take a French example. It is not about a rather superficial communication of nice effects; it is not about something aesthetic.
The word “laboratory” means, first of all, alchemy. This was a very private space, which subsequently became more open to select experts, gentlemen. Later, it became the space in which one commits all the errors but which, by and large, remains completely hidden. What Luc is talking about is completely contemporary: the laboratory which becomes public again, or, under the eyes of the public, is coherent with another laboratory on scale 1, which is the collective experiment we all do, collectively, with shared intelligence ... global warming. We have not become again interested in the laboratory for aesthetic reasons. We are in a scale 1 laboratory. Antwerp is a laboratory on scale 1.
One speaks about a laboratorium, and that entails a set of specifications. Who are the artists, who are the scientists capable of reestablishing a connection with the public? This is against the autonomy of the artist—it took three centuries before the artist became autonomous, two centuries before the scientist became autonomous. But today, one is no longer interested in the autonomous scientist. The autonomous scientist becomes an enemy, both politically and scientifically. The autonomous scientist doesn't do anything interesting anymore, the scientist is bought, and the autonomous artist is dead . . . or is about to die.
We are not interested in showing the scenery. It has been done a thousand times. It is voyeurism. It is about risk: on one hand the experiment can fail, and on the other hand, we have to open up contact with the public. Therefore, the laboratory becomes a space that differs from the usual sharing of public and private. It is more delicate, but more interesting. The fact of saying that we are no longer in a period that the autonomous and private artist or scientist, can be interesting people. On the contrary, the person in the laboratory—whether artist or scientist doesn't really matter—comes back and needs a public, and not as a spectator or in a pedagogical way. That is what is interesting. It is the laboratorium.
The problem is communicating with others. In biology, medical biology, it is almost necessary to try an experiment that involves people. They can, for instance, take products, or get injections,... a test that changes the behavior of the population . . .

Carsten Höller: I am thinking about the hangover experiment I proposed last time. I drank too much yesterday to see what it would lead to if I arrive here with a hangover. But it didn't work very well; it takes more liquor. We didn't talk very much about the element of doubt. The laboratory is also something one must have doubts about. Why would we have to choose between two paths, why can't we stay within the two paths? We don't move. Is the laboratory really necessary? Is it necessary to make scientific experiments? Do we have to make art? What's the use? As we can't find a solution, we have to introduce this idea of the laboratory of doubt. As it is not possible to destroy the laboratory, we will nevertheless introduce the laboratory of doubt.

Luc Steels: Doubt is extremely important. Part of the reason for conducting the experiment in public is to convince people of something. It is best to arrive with an attitude contrary to what we want to show. I think that's why one conducts experiments. With the Talking Heads we can write papers, make theories, centuries of theory on language. But it is unique to materialize a theory in a certain way and therefore change everything. It changes the degree to which people who see this, are convinced. The best experiments are done with people who arrive at an opinion that is completely contrary to what they expected, or who doubt that it is possible. The experiment could change their opinion or their perception. There's a criterion that seems very important to me in the choice of activities. The process doesn't suffice; there have to be doubts, contrary opinions that emerge in the discussion, the experiment needs to push forward some things.

Luc Steels: The question from the scientific side, after all these experiments, is, Did this change people's opinions? We put the issues on the table and did this change people's opinion?

Carsten Höller: One needs to question all these progressive elements of the laboratory. Doubt is necessary. You need to see what is possible to do but at the same time, is it really necessary to do what is possible? Is it not better to leave it, without having a result, as a matter of fact? Couldn't it be that the result is a diminution? Wouldn't it be better to remain in a state that is pre- or post-result?

Bruno Latour: . . . An asceticism of some sort, the ascetic laboratory. It is a good idea, as the ascetic character of a laboratory where one wouldn't learn ... We have to leave that open, too, because the way in which Luc Steels presents it could also imply a Pasteurian laboratory. Your public experiment is a public laboratory, and it convinces massively, it convinces masses. We are in a relatively modern, modernist, progressist perspective. Instead of doing it on a small scale in an isolated place we do it on a large scale, it is Bouilly-Lefort with Pasteur, we convert the whole of France into a public experiment. It's Archimedes. What's more, it could be interesting to ask Peter Gallison to do a talk on large public experiments. But what Carsten Höller says is also something else. The laboratory could become the cultivated and the new means of culture, by which one finds oneself confronted with large problems inside this scale 1 laboratory, is the world in which we are now. It would be an experiment, even a religious experiment, at least in the sense of suspense. Zen . . . you are speaking about a Zen laboratory. It is a laboratory with plenty of machines but where one ends at a point of suspension . . .

Carsten Höller: What he said about changing the opinion doesn't mean that everybody has the same opinion. If the opinion has changed, it can mean that everybody has a different opinion. That's what I find interesting: There is no result, in the sense that there is a certain truth, yet the result produces, in itself, also the counter truth, which is the counter result, and this also goes a bit further. It happens between these two poles. The underlying idea is always the changing of the paradigm (first one used to believe like that and afterward one believes like that). That's how scientific progress came about. But it could be nice to try to find, because there is no truth in itself....

Luc Steels: That's the beginning of a more profound discussion.

Book Machine
By Bruce Mau


The two underlying ambitions of our project, Book Machine, were to make the project itself a working laboratory, and to demonstrate the book's vitality simply by treating the production of a book as a real-time performance.

The traditional definition of "book" has created a kind of self-fulfilling prophecy in which people continue to produce books that are meant to entomb the material. I see bookmaking as a process of rolling forward, a process that continues its momentum with every reading. It is not something that stops.

The experiment we undertook with Book Machine is one of translation. To move from one form to another the material has to pass through a kind of translation filter. This can be a process of clarification and intensification, or the opposite. Somehow, one has to make the concepts, the forms, the events, and the drama of one medium speak in and through another.

Book Machine is a massive documentation-capture project and cataloging system that was shown as a real-time print performance in Antwerp, tracking and interpreting an exhibition process and its residue over a period of four months. From June to October 1999, Book Machine (which comprised two Macintosh computers, two scanners, a color printer, and two assistants), operated within the exhibition's headquarters at Antwerp's Museum of Photography.

We thought of the people involved in the Book Machine as the filter. Their task was to capture a variety of wild events and pass them through a prism and into the book, and to make these events meaningful in a discursive context with all the other material.

Book Machine was an ongoing project that allowed the content and context of the catalogue-publication process to converge. The catalogue became performative. As each page came through the Book Machine it was mounted on the wall, starting at the top left-hand corner of its venue and continuing across all the walls in rows. The design process was implemented as a laboratory. In the first two days of the Laboratorium exhibition, Book Machine produced over three hundred spreads. By the end of three months it had processed six thousand images and almost 18,500,000 characters of text.

The Book Machine Manual: A set of instructions and equipment to produce the catalogue for Laboratorium.

Equipment

Two Macintosh G3 computers, each with a 4G hard drive, 120MB of RAM Software: graphics applications and fonts, E-mail and ISDN line, one color printer, two flatbed scanners, with ability to scan transparencies, one Zip drive, one table, two chairs, two table lamps, one filing cabinet with lock, Ethernet network, one CD burner

Staff

Two assistants on site. The function of the assistants is comparable to that of a colorist, someone who fills in color where outlines are given. They may do this in an organized way or they may be arbitrary, moving outside the lines.

Two designers at BMD

The role of the designers is to provide structure by creating the list of instructions and techniques to be used in the production of the work.

Procedure

Establish form and content

Laboratorium will be the main source of content for this exercise, providing form and morphology to the Book Machine.

Collect material

Photograph, record, videotape, transcribe, download, surf
Web sites, record data, visualize information, make graphs, visit installations, talk, ask questions, transmit calls for submissions.

Start with the spread (two facing pages laid open)

Think of the spread as a space, and of the page as a unit within the spread.
Define the page dimensions. The number of pages is unlimited.

Insert the grid

The grid provides structural consistency beneath the surface of the book. Everything will "snap" to the grid. The text area and the page must always have the same proportions. At its largest, the text area will follow the golden canon of Jan Tschichold, drawn in 1953: the inner margin is one-ninth the page width; the outer margin is two-ninths the page width; the top margin is one-ninth the page height; and the bottom margin is two-ninths the page height. Depending on the desired length of the finished text piece, the text box can shrink along a diagonal line drawn from the top inner corner of the page down to the outer bottom corner. The top inner corner of the text box remains constant in its position and the bottom outer corner moves up and down the diagonal. If the text area is very small, a short text can thus be made to fill many pages.

Select the associated images

Representations of artists' works must not be cropped or altered. Use a full horizontal or full vertical dimension of the page, depending on the orientation of the image. The rest of the page is left blank. Situation images are infinitely flexible and can be cropped, manipulated, and treated as required.

Apply the appropriate templates and masks

Templates define the position of content within the spreads. Masks control the degree of expression of this content. (For example, a particular mask is 70 percent opaque and therefore only 30 percent of the content is expressed.)

Specify typography

All typography will conform to the rules of composition and typographic specifications outlined in each elaborated template description.

Create feedback loop. Process the content through various filters. The filter can be any of the following: a critic, collaborator, commentator, peer, analyst, curator, editor, person off the street, or visitor to the exhibit. Capture and incorporate the response from the filter into the piece. This information flow allows for the crossbreeding of systems, triggers conflict, and transforms and amplifies the content.


Templates

As new forms of content are identified that cannot be accommodated by the existing templates, new templates must be created and recorded. Among them might be:

Essays

Read the essay. Determine the most important themes/subjects of the text and find related images. The text is always inserted on the right-hand page. Images are always placed on the left-hand page. All images require a caption. Captions occur directly under the images and are arranged in such a way that the reader can intuit which captions refer to which image. Notes and extracts are always set one point smaller than the body text. First line of each note is indented. Indentation is always equal to the leading.

Project proposals

Read the proposal. Determine the most important themes of the text and find related images. These pages have two live areas, a smaller one for the text and a larger one for the images and their captions. Run the text through the pages and insert the images into a position where they are relevant to the text. At least one edge of each image should be touching the image area margin. All images require a caption. Captions occur directly below the image.

Notes and experiment logs

Organize all notes and logbook entries chronologically and code them with a numeric system (by time, by date, or by order of occurrence). Organize each entry with its respective images inserted directly below the entry title. The image should be sized to the full column width. Any information about the image should be included at the beginning of the entry.

Slide lectures

Attend the lecture or watch the lecture video. Ask one question. Ensure that texts are transcribed and translated. Collect the most important images. Organize images in chronological order and pair them with their associated texts. The images and their texts are organized like the pages of a comic book. The images are arranged in an orthogonal grid, with four to six images per page. The text always occurs directly below each slide image. All images require a text or caption.

Lectures without images

Attend the lecture or watch the lecture video. Ask one question. Ensure that texts are transcribed and translated. Scan the text for the most important, or most interesting, statements and extracts. Organize extracts in chronological order and place them on the left-hand page of each spread. The lecture text flows in its complete form on the right-hand pages of the spread.

Interviews

Read the interview. Determine the most significant themes of the interview and find images that are relevant to or evocative of these ideas. Each voice in the conversation gets its own typeface. Every left-hand page carries text and every right-hand page carries a full bleed image.

Emphasized charts and diagrams

Collect as much quantitative and qualitative data as possible related to all the work. Determine the clearest graphic representation of the data. Three-dimensional graphics are preferred.

Tabletop experiments

Watch each performance video. Select stills that represent animated gestures, varied demonstration techniques, and simultaneous use of multiple presentation media. Link each image to the appropriate section of text. Every image needs text, and you need enough images to illustrate all the texts.

The overcolumned layout

Some content will need to be displayed in narrow columns. Create pages with too many columns to amplify the dense nature of the material. Some pages could have up to ten vertical columns, and the content can be set in very small but still legible type. Use the city Yellow Pages as a model.

Images as seeds

Some contributions have many reference images. To accommodate such large quantities, images can be reproduced in very tiny sizes, as seeds, dispersed throughout the body of the text.

Snap-to-corners image essays

Image essays can be applied to the spreads by placing an image at each of the four corners of the spread. The images should not be cropped, and they should be made as large as possible without allowing overlapping.

Simultaneous image essays

One series of images can commence within a second image essay. The first series is formatted with full-spread, full-bleed images. Toward the middle of this image sequence, the first image of the second series should occur as a small picture in the bottom right-hand corner of a spread. After this point, every subsequent spread has an image from the second sequence in this same location. Once the first sequence of images is completed, the second sequence keeps on going in this corner location until it ends. This second series of images can also become incrementally larger until it overtakes the first sequence, eventually becoming as large as the whole spread.

Big captions

Reverse the usual image-caption relationship. Some works may be made up of small images and big captions. In this case each image is placed in the exact center of the spread across the gutter. The size of the image must also allow space for a column of text and the caption, attached to the right side of the image. The caption text box starts exactly halfway down the right side of the image and is equal to two times the width of the image. These proportions are constant, even as the size of the image changes.


MASKS

There are currently four masks. This number can be expanded.

Graduated perforations

This mask is made up of graduated, opaque circles. All the circle centers are on a constant grid, but the circle sizes gradually increase, from mere specs in a large field of space on the far side of the mask, to large opaque spheres that touch at all four axis points so that there is a minimum amount of space between them.

Spikes

This mask is made up of long, narrow triangular spikes with abutting edges at one end and points that taper to the far side of the mask to reveal an image of the space beyond which is the inverse shape of the mask.

Soft Spaces

This mask is a series of soft-edged ellipses that act as holes leading to a space beyond.

Perforation

This mask is a regularized grid of circular holes punched through the surface of the spread. All the holes are the same size, and the space between them is equal to their diameter.

Introdução por Adriano Pedrosa

É difícil definir Laboratorium com clareza e precisão. No início do verão europeu de 1999, recebi seu pequeno e denso Program Book pelo correio, contendo informações sobre suas várias atividades e eventos. Tratava-se de uma exposição, um simpósio, uma série de workshops, performances, experiências públicas? O livro de programação anunciava Laboratorium como um "projeto interdisciplinar", com curadoria de Hans-Ulrich Obrist e Barbara Vanderlinden, uma co-produção entre Antwerpen Open, Roomade e o Provinciaal Museum voor Fotografie, no contexto de um programa que celebrava os 400 anos de Anthony van Dyck. Seria isso sobre arte?

É útil recordar alguns dos mais de 60 "participantes" de Laboratorium para se ter uma idéia da abrangência e variedade do projeto. Aí estavam incluídas figuras como Francisco Varela, diretor do Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Isabelle Stengers, professora de filosofia da Université Libre de Bruxelles, Luc Steels, diretor do Sony Computer Laboratory em Paris, Bruno Latour, professor do Centre de Sociologie de l’Innovation na École Nationale Superieure de Mines de Paris, a coreógrafa americana Meg Stuart, o designer baseado em Toronto Bruce Mau, o cineasta alemão Harum Farocki, o arquiteto holandês Rem Koolhaas, e artistas como Panamarenko, Matt Mullican, Tomoko Takahashi, Oladélé Bamgboyé, Joseph Grigley, Carsten Höller, e o grupo baseado em Dakar denominado Laboratoire Agit-Art.

Eu estaria na Europa naquele verão e então planejei visitar Antuérpia para ver o projeto. Porém qual seria o período mais apropriado para a visita? O projeto não apenas se expandira pela cidade, mas também por todo o verão, até 3 de outubro. O escritório de Laboratorium sugeriu o final de semana de 27 de junho. Eu compraria o catálogo assim que chegasse à cidade, pensei, e após folheá-lo à noite no hotel, tudo se esclareceria. Contudo, ao chegar a Antuérpia, não encontrei nenhum catálogo, apenas um estranho Book Machine [Máquina de Livro], cujas páginas eram produzidas copiosamente no estúdio de Bruce Mau em Toronto e afixadas diariamente às paredes do Museu de Fotografia em Antuérpia.

Sobre o que era Laboratorium, afinal? As questões do projeto giravam em torno do conceito e da prática no laboratório: o que é um laboratório? O que é uma experiência? Quais são seus status? Como surgem e se modificam? Qual é sua relação com o público? Com a arte? Qual é a relação entre o ateliê e o laboratório? Entre práticas científicas, especulativas e artísticas? Por outro lado, Laboratorium também suscitou novas questões sobre aquele objeto que nos é tão familiar: a exposição. Obrist e Vanderlinden vêm sendo reconhecidos como curadores que desafiam persistentemente os limites e as possibilidades da construção de exposições. Não se trata tanto de projetos que se apresentam como incursões ou jogos formais sobre o gênero expositivo, mas que como curadores eles vêm encontrando novas formas de expor, questionar e falar sobre arte contemporânea muito além das paredes do cubo branco. Um dos aspectos mais relevantes dos projetos de Obrist e de Vanderlinden é como exposição, discussões, conferências, simpósios, publicações e outros meios e sítios são articulados em formas inovadoras e estimulantes. Laboratorium é um bom exemplo nesse sentido e já se está tornando uma importante referência para aqueles que pensam seriamente sobre a prática da construção de exposições. O caráter experimental do projeto (no sentido formal e temático) conecta seu motif central ao meio mesmo do qual faz uso — a exposição como laboratório.

Aqui reproduzimos fragmentos de sessões de discussões realizadas em preparação para Laboratorium, em Antuérpia, em outubro, e em Paris, em novembro de 1998. Os participantes são os dois curadores do projeto e três de seus colaboradores mais próximos: Bruno Latour, Carsten Höller e Luc Steels. Essas sessões de discussão preliminar [brainstorming sessions] demonstram como o laboratório é uma noção-chave para o projeto em termos de conteúdo, sítio e forma. Mediante este Telesymposium, sessões brainstorming tornam-se públicas como o próprio Laboratorium e seus "Dias de Laboratórios Abertos". Nas palavras de Vanderlinden:

"Ao tornar isso público, esperamos oferecer uma abordagem melhor à exposição per se e reconhecer a urgência de localizar o debate centrado em exposições e estimulado por elas. Acreditamos, ainda, que tais discussões oferecem uma abordagem ao que geralmente permanece excluído da exposição, e assim fazemos que alguns processos envolvidos se tornem mais palpáveis. É impossível reconstituir tudo que foi dito. Portanto, optamos por publicar fragmentos com afirmações daqueles que tanto contribuíram para o conceito de Laboratorium".

Uma seção especial, ao final deste Telesymposium, é dedicada ao Book Machine de Bruce Mau. Aqui reproduzimos os conceitos e as orientações da contribuição do designer. Mais uma vez, outro objeto que nos é tão familiar é inteiramente questionado e levado para além de seus limites — o catálogo de exposição. Sua versão final, uma edição das centenas de páginas produzidas no verão europeu de 1999 em Toronto e Antuérpia, será lançado neste outono por Dumont. Aguardo com expectativa recebê-lo e folheá-lo à noite no hotel. Tudo então se esclarecerá.

Adriano Pedrosa


< Discussão realizada no Museu Real de Belas Artes, 8 de outubro de 1998, Antuérpia >

Barbara Vanderlinden (BV): Para dar continuidade ao assunto, eu gostaria de resumir o que foi dito nesta manhã. Falamos das complexidades inerentes aos processos de produção criativa e das possibilidades de nosso projeto ensejar uma série de abordagens ao modo como a pesquisa experimental é conduzida por artistas e cientistas. Em vista da mistura heterogênea, escolhemos o 'laboratório' e o 'estúdio' como forma de conferir unidade a essa investigação. A examinarmos os produtos finais, preferimos nos concentrar nos ‘passos de desenvolvimento’ que os mediam e apresentar um ponto de vista mais sofisticado do qual ciência e arte possam ser vistas em suas constantes transformações. A tentarmos chegar diretamente ao significado de um trabalho, preferimos adquirir conhecimento por meio da observação de suas transformações dinâmicas. Como modelo para tal exposição ou investigação, estabelecemos um grupo central que funciona como um organismo preparatório e nos permite investigar, com especialistas em diferentes campos da arte e ciência, o modelo de uma exposição como esta. Esse primeiro passo, ou seja, o estágio de discussão, de algum modo constitui a parte invisível do projeto. O segundo elemento, ou componente público do projeto, deveria incluir laboratórios de verdade... tanto os laboratórios existentes em Antuérpia como os laboratórios ou experiências montados por ocasião do projeto. Gostaríamos de convidar profissionais de diversas áreas para colaborar na montagem de um laboratório desse tipo. Alguns desses indivíduos já foram contatados. Outra opção seria realizar uma série de demonstrações ou experiências em público, conforme concepção de Bruno Latour. Outra possibilidade seria algum tipo de laboratório de informações, que incluiria todo o material de pesquisa. Essa opção revelaria o projeto de modo muito diferente e serviria como “lata de lixo” da exposição, ao incluir não apenas arquivos, computadores etc. mas também as publicações utilizadas no decorrer de nossa pesquisa. Com o exame desse material, o público tomaria conhecimento do conceito de laboratório no contexto de literatura, teatro, performance... e outras disciplinas. A arquitetura também seria uma perspectiva interessante.

Bruno Latour (BL): Existe uma bibliografia extensa sobre arquitetura e laboratórios...

BV: Exatamente, portanto poderíamos investigar os espaços arquitetônicos em que os artistas e cientistas trabalham. Conforme o historiador de ciências Peter Galison e a historiadora de arte Caroline Jones mostram em sua recente publicação, o significado de todos esses lugares é mais reconhecido num âmbito específico do que no geral. Os autores observaram que a arquitetura dos espaços utilizados como laboratórios e ateliês passou por uma mudança, de instalações “domésticas” para prédios comerciais e industriais. Ao mesmo tempo, poderíamos investigar a relação entre esses espaços e os espaços de exposição, onde mais recentemente notamos uma ênfase no processo e não no produto sendo apresentado...

Hans Ulrich Obrist (HUO): Há ainda a idéia interessante dos laboratórios ready-made. Quando visitamos o Laboratório de Pesquisa Hidráulica em Antuérpia, onde os pesquisadores estudam a influência das ondas e correntes nos portos marítimos, ficamos maravilhados com a beleza de suas maquetes e modelos em pequena escala de portos. Por isso, pensamos que alguns desses laboratórios reais poderiam ser mostrados da maneira como são e ficar abertos à visitação durante a exposição, não em período integral, mas em dias e horários predeterminados. Essa idéia nos leva à seguinte questão importante: o tempo, não apenas em relação aos laboratórios mas também à exposição. O que significa afirmar que a exposição tem duração de vários meses? Algumas coisas podem ser mostradas apenas por alguns segundos. A experiência Talking Heads de Luc Steels será conduzida durante toda a exposição; outras coisas poderão ter curta duração. Portanto, certos laboratórios poderiam ficar abertos à visitação uma vez por semana, ou algumas horas por dia. Talvez possamos conseguir isso até a abertura da exposição. Por um lado, temos os laboratórios em Antuérpia; por outro, poderíamos mapear os laboratórios fora da cidade, como os de Paris e Londres. Conversando com o Bruno, tivemos a idéia de traçar um mapa com a localização geográfica dos laboratórios, que poderia ser inserido no catálogo. Esta questão nos leva a um último e importantíssimo tema, o do catálogo, que devemos discutir nesta tarde. Gostaríamos de ouvir suas opiniões a respeito.

BL: Pelo visto, foi aberta a arena para troca de idéias. Estive pensando no que você disse nesta manhã sobre a indústria. O aspecto interessante a respeito do modelo de escala é o de modelar em escala. Entretanto, os modelos em grande escala, o oposto, constituem uma parte muito importante da indústria. Vejam, por exemplo, a questão de se construírem protótipos para uma grande indústria química. A maquete é um ponto-chave para a empresa. Agora pergunto: que tamanho ela deve ter para que se possa detectar um defeito em escala 1? Isso pode ser um pesadelo, porque quanto maior for a maquete, mais ela custará. E se não for bem projetada, não fornecerá novas informações sobre o que acontecerá na escala 1. Há um grande número de dispositivos para este fim que são fabricados em escala. Há ainda uma indústria de projetos de maquetes para o ramo da química. Eles parecem de brinquedo; não é possível fazê-los no computador.

Carsten Höller (CH): Naturalmente, tudo isso se torna possível desde que a idéia do laboratório nos agrade. Teremos de representar no laboratório a redução do mundo exterior, em escala menor. Para isso, às vezes teremos de excluir alguns fatores para que possamos compreender melhor os outros e ao mesmo tempo melhorar sua acessibilidade. Esse poderia ser o ponto de partida para toda a exposição. Aliás, eu ainda tenho problemas com o termo 'exposição': poderia ser uma mostra, uma representação de coisas diferentes...

BV: Ou um programa de atividades, cuja organização se basearia num cronograma, em vez da planta baixa de uma exposição.

CH: A linha mestra dos projetos deve passar pela escolha do que deverá ser mostrado e do que deverá estar acessível. Esta é a idéia de desenvolver algo, um sistema dinâmico, um trabalho em andamento (a work in progress). Evidentemente “sistema dinâmico” é uma expressão bastante inadequada, pois todas essas coisas deveriam ter em comum seu aspecto evolutivo. Acho isso muito interessante, pois dessa forma a dinâmica se apresenta nas diferentes fases do desenvolvimento, e não no momento em que as esculturas já foram concluídas e as pinturas pintadas e penduradas na parede.

LS: Como somos todos muito ocupados, eu gostaria de saber de que modo vamos levar à frente o projeto, e quanto tempo deveremos despender... Em outras palavras, precisamos de um cronograma.

BL: Pensei que estávamos aqui para trocar idéias, mas agora vejo que estamos tomando uma ducha fria!

BV: Todas essas coisas são muito importantes e talvez possam ser discutidas mais tarde. Ainda dispomos de algum tempo, um pouco mais do que de costume, tendo em vista que em geral as exposições são organizadas às pressas se comparadas a tarefas executadas em outras disciplinas; mesmo assim sabemos que não temos tanto tempo assim...

HUO: É justamente por isso que optamos por um número reduzido de projetos, de camadas diferentes que a mostra, o projeto, o trabalho em andamento podem ter.

CH: Mas trabalho em andamento é um termo altamente estigmatizado!

BL: Será que você poderia me explicar por que este termo recebeu uma conotação tão pejorativa na história da arte?

BV: Essa conotação negativa surgiu quando a expressão se tornou muito estética para algo que não deveria ser um gênero em termos de estética.

BL: Então a palavra ‘laboratório’ permanece intocada, intocada pela ciência.

CH: Pelo menos é neutra.

< Pausa >

BL: Hans e Barbara me trouxeram aqui com a promessa de que eu não teria de trabalhar, somente dar idéias, mas pelo visto vocês já estão pensando numa construção...

LS: Porém o meu papel é diferente; aliás, exerço um papel duplo. No que diz respeito ao cronograma, minha posição é igual à sua; não posso me ocupar de coisas práticas.

BL: Estou pensando em algo que podemos introduzir na discussão, e de meu ponto de vista ainda estamos trocando idéias. Trata-se de Adam Lowe. Ele conduziu uma pesquisa extremamente interessante sobre gravuras digitais e criou o Museu da Gravura, um acervo que existe e foi exposto apenas algumas vezes — algo similar a um laboratório. A exposição compreende uma mostra de 30 processos diferentes aos quais uma mesma imagem foi submetida por um sistema de impressão digital existente no mercado. A exposição é surpreendente. Nas 30 imagens, as diferenças entre os diversos processos de impressão são evidentes. Em termos de informação, seus conteúdos são exatamente iguais, mas ao final da impressão as imagens têm uma aparência totalmente diferente. Trata-se de algo notável, que ainda assim é simples de trazer aqui. Encaixa-se bem no espírito do laboratório, exceto que agora temos um laboratório de impressão. Temos uma imagem na tela e o resultado de sua transferência para o papel.

LS: Com certeza isso é um fato nos laboratórios da empresa belga de fotografia Agva-Gevaert. Sei que eles mantém grupos de pesquisa trabalhando na área digital.

BV: E que pode estar relacionado ao Museu da Fotografia, o qual já mostrou grande interesse em co-produzir este projeto.

BL: Pelo visto estamos tomando ducha fria enquanto trocamos idéias... Quero saber se o Van Dyck estava interessado na impressão em quatro cores.

HUO: É, acho que estamos fazendo as duas coisas.... Por um lado, formamos um grupo que apresenta e debate idéias em busca de soluções; somos o núcleo pensante da exposição, de onde saem conselhos e propostas. A função de mentor não implica trabalho. Ao contrário, significa apresentar idéias e estabelecer contatos com outras pessoas. Em relação à produção, desde o início combinamos que nos comprometeríamos apenas com poucos projetos, e que eles seriam totalmente produzidos em Antuérpia. Da maneira como Luc descreveu seu projeto, é possível que haja muitos aspectos tecnológicos que não poderemos produzir, e nesse sentido trata-se de um co-laboratório. Entretanto, como mentor, no que se refere ao Bruno e sua Experiência em Público.

BL: Será que primeiro você poderia me lembrar qual era a idéia?

HUO: Sim, você observou que seria bom conduzir algumas Experiências de Mesa durante uma semana, ou um dia, como você fez em Paris. A idéia era que os cientistas fizessem suas experiências diante dos espectadores. Na semana de abertura, nos primeiros dois ou três dias do evento, poderíamos ter cerca de 20 ou 30 cientistas trabalhando assim.

BV: Nós também pensamos em publicar um livro sobre este assunto.

HUO: Exatamente, um livro contendo experiências do tipo “faça você mesmo”. Não são apenas os cientistas, mas também os artistas que realizam Experiências de Mesa. Naturalmente, tudo dependerá de seu cronograma. Uma possibilidade é que você, na função de mentor, apresente nomes de cientistas que sejam interessantes; outra seria você mesmo fazer Experiências de Mesa.

BL: Acho que não devemos misturar os dois aspectos da discussão. É muito complicado nos tornarmos muito práticos tão rapidamente; além disso, sou francês e sempre tenho dificuldade em pôr as coisas em prática... Voltando às experiências públicas, seria interessante termos workshops, ou “pacotes de tarefas” como dizem os professores. Poderíamos escolher um tema como dioxina ou câncer de mama, ou qualquer outra questão relevante para as pessoas em Antuérpia, e aí convidarmos especialistas que tratam abertamente desses assuntos, para estabelecermos a controvérsia. Há milhares dessas questões no campo da saúde. E daí, com certa malícia, fazer as perguntas: por que não pode haver uma conversão? O que pode ser exposto publicamente sobre a dificuldade de se chegar a um consenso? Por que a dificuldade? Será por causa das estatísticas, da experiência de laboratório? Será pela deficiência de dados?

BV:...Aqui em Antuérpia há um instituto de pesquisa muito interessante chamado Instituto Tropical, que lida com questões de saúde, como a doença do sono e aids.

LS: Há também o laboratório que testa a qualidade da água, do ar... os níveis de poluição.

BL: Mas nosso interesse está em mostrar o processo. Acho que nesse aspecto encontraremos obstáculos em muitos países, como por exemplo na Suíça. O que é ciência pública? Penso que o workshop não tem por finalidade encontrar uma solução, mas expor o problema. No caso do câncer de mama, um médico de um dos hospitais de Antuérpia poderá argumentar que o assunto é muito técnico...

LS: Lembremos que é importante observar o impacto legal da proposta, uma vez que na realidade as empresas farmacêuticas ou médicos responsáveis por diagnósticos errados são processados. Portanto não estamos falando de uma discussão teórica. Ao tomarem decisões, as pessoas se confrontam com a questão “em quem acreditar?”; elas precisam fazer julgamentos, e depois serão julgadas por suas decisões. Portanto, não se trata apenas do fato de os especialistas discutirem mas também da sociedade exigir que a ciência faça julgamentos rigorosos.

BL: Os julgamentos não são absolutos e rigorosos, eles são compartilhados.

LS: Mas o médico que supostamente cometeu um erro está sendo processado. Será justo julgar, tendo em vista que há pontos de vista diferentes? Portanto, o papel da ciência...

HUO: Estamos falando de responsabilidade limitada e ilimitada?

LS: Sim, e das expectativas do público em relação à ciência.

BL: Se quisermos atrair público para a exposição, acredito que assuntos relacionados com a saúde possam oferecer um bom ponto de partida, pois hoje em dia temos casos de pessoas que procuram os médicos praticamente com o bisturi nas mãos. Isso interessa a todos. Caso se decida por 15 projetos, será preciso um laboratório para cada um deles? Poderíamos eleger uma questão de interesse público como ponto de partida. Um assunto que, trabalhado em reverso, poderá levar a um laboratório. Se resolvermos examinar o câncer de mama, chegaremos a uma controvérsia. Antigamente as pessoas acreditavam que ao procurar cientistas se chegava a uma conversão de opiniões. Hoje, chega-se a uma digressão. Todo mundo tem uma história para contar. Resta saber quantos laboratórios devemos expor em público para mostrar aos espectadores por que é tão difícil chegar a opiniões convergentes. Às vezes é a estatística, ou a disputa entre disciplinas quando algo se situa entre duas disciplinas. Um modo de se questionar o laboratório seria pelas questões de interesse público. Seria interessante sentir as questões trazidas por pessoas dispostas a apresentá-las e discuti-las.

LS: Acredito que isso traz à luz algo que não está na sua lista. O modo como a ciência funciona é evidente não apenas em laboratórios mas também nos workshops. Acho que seria muito interessante organizar alguns workshops como locais para onde as pessoas possam trazer suas idéias e confrontá-las. E onde os resultados da discussão são visíveis. Nesse tipo de exposição a origem das idéias vem para o primeiro plano.

BV: A própria noção de resultado poderia ser algo concebido de modos diversos na arte e na ciência. Basta tomar como exemplo o artista norte-americano Joseph Grigeley, que mantém um tipo de laboratório de linguagem...

HUO: Alguém viu isso na Manifesta, em Roterdã? O trabalho se baseava na idéia de que o artista iria passar duas semanas na cidade. Foi um processo que cresceu durante as duas semanas e como um complexo sistema dinâmico em relação ao complexo sistema dinâmico da cidade. Esta idéia de processo é muito interessante; pode ser apresentada em estágios diferentes, e também como idéia de interioridade e exterioridade. O problema com os workshops é estabelecer um limite para a participação do público, além de definir se os eventos devem ser públicos ou não. É como num debate, o essencial acontece no táxi ou durante o intervalo.

CH: Creio que a idéia do câncer de mama tem duas desvantagens. Em primeiro lugar, não se trata de assunto de interesse geral, além de ser muito trágico. O fenômeno da ressaca é mais interessante como moléstia. Há pouca pesquisa sobre ressaca, embora seja algo muito comum. Recentemente li um artigo sobre esse assunto, descrevendo o trabalho de três pesquisadores que lidavam com hipóteses diferentes, o que mostra que ninguém sabe nada a respeito disso. No máximo, as pessoas fazem experiências individuais na manhã seguinte, quando, ao tentarem se livrar da ressaca, tomam mais uma cerveja ou outra bebida.

BL: O uso de drogas também poderia ser um tema interessante; ressaca é um pouco esquisito.

CH: O uso de drogas não é uma experiência comum e compartilhada, enquanto a maioria das pessoas sabe o que é uma ressaca por experiência própria.

BL: Eu apenas bebo meu vinho, portanto...

CH:...São poucas as pessoas que bebem e nunca tiveram uma ressaca. É muito diferente e não há regra geral para o tratamento de ressaca. Poderia ser um bom ponto de partida para um laboratório: investigar o tratamento, estabelecer o que é, explicar seus efeitos de maneira científica.

LS: E as pessoas virão para o laboratório com ressaca...

BV: Este é um tema engraçado, que não é cercado de tabu; portanto, como pode ser uma questão de interesse público?

CH: O fato de ser engraçado não o faz ser menosprezado.

BL: Se pudermos conceber 15 maneiras de lidar com o interesse do público em laboratório, cada uma delas seria muito diferente das outras. Uma dessas maneiras seria atrair curiosidade. Eu estava pensando em algo que de fato seja uma questão de interesse para as pessoas em Antuérpia. Quanto tempo será necessário para trazermos um laboratório que possa provocar uma controvérsia e, como conseqüência, educar o público em geral? Há muitas abordagens para esse tema, várias maneiras de tratarmos o assunto do laboratório, como pudemos notar em nossa discussão até o momento. Em Antuérpia, as pessoas poderão não mostrar interesse agora, mas no momento em que visitarem a mostra ficarão atraídas pelo assunto. Outra coisa que devemos discutir são as Experiências em Público. Não se trata de convidar cientistas para fazer palestras. Não queremos trazer fatos científicos observados em outros lugares; queremos poder observar os fenômenos na própria sala. É claro que a experiência poderá falhar, ou não ser nada espetacular; ou então ela poderá ser bem-sucedida e espetacular, e a partir daí, deveremos interpretá-la. O que pedimos a vocês é que nos apontem as dificuldades em trazer a experiência para cá. Foi o que fiz com o filósofo científico Simon Schaeffer, que reproduziu uma experiência de Newton com a participação de 400 pessoas em Paris. Foi extraordinário. Ele demonstrou a teoria das cores. Entretanto, com 400 pessoas não podíamos usar um prisma, e utilizamos uma câmara, que por sua vez alterava as cores. Na verdade, as cores eram tão ruins que as pessoas não viam nada. Portanto, resta saber o que as pessoas testemunharam no século 17... Por que o mesmo não aconteceu em Paris? Trata-se de transformar em tópico a questão de como transportar o laboratório. Para começar, em que medida pode ser transportado? Este é um assunto muito complexo. Vejam por exemplo os centros de saúde que cuidam excessivamente da higiene, em detrimento da poluição. Na realidade não se pode transportar a experiência sem perder a precisão e a maior parte dos dados. Na televisão, cientistas mostram slides ilustrativos, mas não o fenômeno em si. Ilya Prigogine tem uma boa explicação para isso, assim como Bernard Self: trata-se de um jogo de reversos, uma experiência muito simples.

LS: Está relacionado com a psicologia da percepção e a ilusão de ótica. Tenho outras idéias que gostaria de apresentar. Uma delas é sobre experiências com animais. Por conta disso, formou-se um grupo terrorista aqui em Flandres, chamado Frente de Liberação Animal. Eles usam bombas para explodir restaurantes McDonald’s etc. Duas vezes em minha vida fiquei chocado ao visitar um laboratório. Na primeira vez, os cientistas faziam experiências com cérebros de macacos. Na segunda vez, num laboratório de física nuclear, houve uma pequena explosão nuclear e o prédio todo começou a tremer. Agora, em relação aos animais, os biólogos tendem a tratá-los como material.

CH: Uma vez assisti a uma experiência em que um camundongo foi colocado dentro de um armário. Ao ser retirado de lá, ele havia contraído câncer.

LS: Se levarmos algo assim para uma exposição, as pessoas ficarão muito chocadas.

CH: Sim, mas nesse caso estaremos às voltas com a estetização do laboratório — o que é uma tarefa até certo ponto perigosa, especialmente no contexto da arte. É claro que a aparência de um laboratório exerce certa fascinação, com todos aqueles recipientes e equipamentos estranhos criando um efeito meio sobrenatural. Ao mesmo tempo, acredito que tal aparência seja uma forma de apropriação e não produz nenhum outro resultado. Este tipo de assunto deve ser conduzido com muito cuidado, especialmente quando se trata de tirar fotografias num laboratório. Não há nada de errado nisso, desde que as fotos sirvam para documentação.

BL: Poderíamos fazer alguma experiência com porcos, como você e Rosemarie Trockel fizeram na Documenta X. A estética geral de um laboratório não se destina a aterrorizar as pessoas com histórias de cientistas malucos. Ou seja, com uma linguagem modernista de aterrorização. Pelo contrário, desejamos um processo que seja complicado, difícil, e que atraia o interesse do público sem terror ou teor pedagógico. Há muitas experiências que se pode fazer no campo do comportamento animal, desde que se tenha os mecanismos para detectar o que os animais desejam. Por exemplo, qual a quantidade de luz apropriada para um porco, se este tivesse a faculdade de escolha? Há truques para se descobrir esse tipo de coisa. No caso dos porcos é fácil, pois eles são muito inteligentes, ao passo que galinhas, patos e outros animais de criação.

CH: Mas normalmente o número de ovos que uma galinha bota é examinado sob diferentes condições...

BL: Pode ser que isso seja um fato nesta região. Trata-se de um tipo de pesquisa muito engenhosa. Sim, há os parâmetros, mas nunca se sabe quais são os parâmetros dos animais. Daí a descoberta que frangos preferem viver em locais menos apinhados. Só estou lançando essas idéias para o caso de haver uma grande indústria de criação e abate de aves por aqui.

CH: Eu poderia lhes fornecer três porcos tratados com hormônios para ser abatidos e comidos, com hormônios e tudo mais. Depois poderíamos esperar para ver o que acontece. Na Bélgica há uma grande discussão sobre hormônios.

BL: Isso é ainda melhor que câncer de mama.

LS: Experiências com animais sempre preocuparam as pessoas. Trata-se de um assunto bastante controverso.

BL: Sim, essa é mais uma possibilidade de gerarmos uma disputa entre o interior e o exterior do laboratório. No início, o laboratório funcionava num local reservado numa mansão, sem qualquer conexão com o mundo exterior. Até que no século 17 permitiu-se o acesso a ele de algumas pessoas com formação acadêmica. Hoje o exterior torna-se um assunto cada vez mais importante. Onde fica o exterior? A pergunta vale para a medicina, no que se refere aos hormônios, e onde todos participam na experiência; vale também para a engenharia genética. Essa é a idéia de ter o mundo inteiro dentro de um laboratório.

BV: São experiências que envolvem todo o globo. É o fato de o laboratório não ser mais o laboratório. Há esse mecanismo pelo qual a própria Terra se transforma em instrumento...

BL: Essa é uma boa idéia, que pode servir como mais uma abordagem.

BV: Experiências em grande escala, ou experiências fora de escala envolvendo laboratórios, como o acelerador de partículas Superconducting Supercollider (SSC), conhecido como "acelerador de um bilhão de dólares", que nos anos 90 se encontrava a uma milha no subsolo do Texas. Embora a obra não tenha sido concluída, o laboratório serviu para mostrar como a ciência contemporânea projeta instrumentos e laboratórios inviáveis. O SSC demostrou que colaboração, gastos orçamentários, alianças políticas e área em termos de quilômetros quadrados podem extrapolar escalas. O projeto SSC, que gerou acirrados debates no Congresso norte-americano, foi elaborado de modo que consumiria bilhões de dólares, quantia suficiente para que o assunto ganhasse repercussão internacional. Numa conversa, Jean Paul Van Bendegem, professor de filosofia da Universidade Livre de Bruxelas (ULB), deu outro exemplo de experiência feita no espaço cósmico. Não consigo reproduzir em detalhes o que ele falou, mas sua preocupação era com os desenvolvimentos científicos que levavam ao impossível ou à impossibilidade dos laboratórios, ou seja, experiências que não podem ser feitas porque necessitam de instrumentos que extrapolam as condições de nosso mundo real. Portanto, o laboratório impossível poderia servir como outra abordagem para a questão de nosso projeto...

BL: Esta é uma idéia excelente porque trata de uma das grandes questões da física. Muitos de meus amigos físicos estão preocupados... Segundo eles, “dentro de poucos anos estaremos ensinando física como latim”. Não há base experimental imaginável. As menores experiências exigem que se promova uma colisão entre galáxias. Muitos de meus amigos dizem que seus alunos estão se tornando novamente matemáticos cada vez mais investigativos por falta de base experimental. Outra possibilidade interessante é fazer da Terra um instrumento, como é feito na radioastronomia, ao se estabelecerem um ponto em Munique, um em Londres e outro na América. Na realidade podemos considerar esses três pontos como uma secção de um telescópio gigante, um radiotelescópio cujo tamanho agora é o de metade da Terra. O conceito de instrumento não é exatamente o mesmo que de laboratório, mas ainda assim é bastante rico.

HUO: Tem algo a ver com a noção do não-realizado, projetos não-realizados em termos de invenções, que não têm importância à época em que são criadas. Cerca de dois anos atrás, analisando a história da Internet, Bruce Sterling mostrou que na verdade a rede fora inventada no início do século 20 em algum lugar da Hungria etc. e que apenas recentemente ela foi atualizada. Portanto isso também tem algo a ver com o não-realizado...

BV: Estamos misturando duas coisas.

BL: Estamos misturando mais do que duas coisas. Por um lado, há a ampliação dos tamanhos; por outro, há a expansão do privado para o público. Eu gostaria de perguntar para Hans e Barbara se existe uma ligação com o mundo da arte, onde um grande número de questões similares estão sempre surgindo. O que é arte? O que faz os artistas criar projetos para os quais eles convocam a participação do público? Será que o mundo da arte está se tornando irreal? Vocês têm intenção de questionar esses temas neste projeto?

< Continuação da discussão, 8 de outubro de 1998, Museu de Belas Artes, Antuérpia >

HUO: Para nós, não faz diferença se temos um artista; o que importa é que os tipos diferentes de laboratório não sejam representações de laboratório e que realmente funcionem. Como posso dizer isso... Só neste ano diversas exposições mostraram os laboratórios a partir do ponto de vista da arte, com a participação de muitos artistas. Há um grande número de obras de arte que tratam do laboratório, que ilustram os laboratórios. Este projeto não deveria levar tanto em conta a representação mas sim o aspecto de performance, o lado evolutivo conforme a descrição de Carsten: o processo do laboratório no tempo.

BV: Vocês acham interessante que o público tome parte nele, ainda que seja apenas um projeto, sem ser enquadrado como exposição?

BL: Este poderia ser mais um dos 15 registros. Acredito que seria muito útil termos 15 registros. Precisamos atrair o público em vez de entediá-lo com coisas que já foram vistas.

HUO: O artista esloveno Marco Peljhan criou um macrolaboratório na Documenta X. Ele foi montado no meio de uma megaexposição, mas ao mesmo tempo era um local de pesquisa, distante do lugar físico da mostra. Acho que deveríamos jogar com os aspectos de exterioridade e interioridade do laboratório em todos os 15 projetos. Poderíamos ter ainda formatos mistos, híbridos.

BV: Uma vez que parte dessa troca de idéias tem a ver com o lado prático do projeto, devo mencionar rapidamente que lá por novembro deveríamos ter uma listagem preliminar dos laboratórios com os quais iremos trabalhar. Definitivamente devemos tabular os dados apresentados em nossas sessões de troca de idéias para podermos estabelecer critérios de seleção.

HUO: Há cerca de 35 laboratórios que vamos visitar nas próximas semanas.

BL: O que vocês me dizem sobre modelação em escala no campo da arte?

BV: Na verdade, há um grande número de artistas trabalhando com modelos em escala, como por exemplo os artistas que constróem maquetes de projetos arquitetônicos. Não sei se é a isso que você se refere, exatamente.

BL: O que vocês têm a dizer sobre falsificação, a possibilidade de fracasso? Isso se aplica à arte?

CH: Em arte não se pode fracassar. Aí temos uma questão interessante. Não se pode fracassar porque o trabalho não envolve objetividade, não há um teste que possa ser aplicado para verificar se existe ou não o fracasso. As coisas acontecem fora de nosso âmbito, ou seja, aqui é importante observar quantas pessoas viram a obra de arte, falaram sobre ela, escreveram sobre ela. A arte não pode ser falsificada no sentido científico estrito. Digamos que haja um objeto da arte que não pode ser falsificado por outra instância. Essa estrutura é completamente diferente daquela da ciência, mas mostra que a idéia de falsificação é muito comum em ciência.

BL: Esta é uma longa discussão...

LS: Acredito que pensar sobre verdade e falsificação absolutas seja uma atitude um tanto quanto antiquada.

BL: Eu não estava falando sobre falsificação, mas sobre fracasso. Você exporia um fracasso em público? Este é meu ponto. É importante distinguir produção de pedagogia, porque você não pode falhar quando está "pedagogizando".

CH: Em arte isso não pode acontecer, pois uma vez que você aponta um fracasso...

BL: As pessoas aplaudem. Foi o que aconteceu enquanto eu apresentava a experiência de Pasteur. Uma garrafa escorregou das minhas mãos e caiu no chão. O público aplaudiu meu erro.

LS: Acho interessante a possibilidade de se fazer experiências com robôs e depois construir toda uma interpretação em torno dessas experiências.

CH: Sim, isso é parte do processo.

LS: Acho também que, apesar de a pessoa que projetou a experiência declarar “Olha, eu acabo de dar uma prova”, o resultado não é claro e transparente.


< Fragmentos de uma discussão no Laboratório Sony, 14 de novembro de 1998, Paris >

BL: Cada questionamento e até mesmo cada apresentação do tema em termos de arte e ciência estão fadados a fracassar, por causa da visibilidade dos resultados, os quais já definimos como o inimigo, ou seja, uma imagem de fractais e uma instalação, e a estetização de ambos. Portanto, a partir do instante em que mencionamos o laboratório, ou laboratorium – a palavra latina pode até ser interessante –, estamos falando de um processo. Ou seja, mais um desafio proposto aos artistas: será que em vez de fazer e refazer as mesmas coisas que vocês fazem em seus ateliês e em suas exposições, vocês são capazes de praticar em público a produção de um fato ou elemento, um efeito, um fato? Fato e efeito são utilizados tanto na ciência como na arte, portanto não são discriminados. Não temos interesse naqueles que não são capazes. Entretanto, creio que não podemos nos referir às pessoas como artistas ou cientistas. O mesmo vale para os laboratórios que mencionamos: será possível deslocar o laboratorium de Antuérpia, os bonobos — chimpanzés pigmeus — do zoológico para que se tornem interessantes e públicos, ou precisamos trazer o público ao zoológico? Eu não sei. Será que o laboratório da costa é capaz de se apresentar publicamente? Sem isso, obteremos resultados semelhantes aos das Experiências de Mesa. Os grandes cientistas mostrarão seus slides para um público ignorante, explicando que o que eles fazem é o máximo. E isso é desinteressante.

Outro aspecto que me parece curioso é a forma atual de abordagem, que realmente é muito especial. Via de regra, não é o laboratório que vem primeiro e depois as coisas que se faz no laboratório. Em primeiro lugar vêm as coisas, as experiências às quais submetemos algo que desejamos conhecer. Para tanto, cria-se uma situação específica e mais tarde utiliza-se o laboratório como um local de apoio, que na verdade é secundário. Nesse caso, o laboratório é algo primordial, que mais tarde é preenchido de algum modo. Acho interessante considerar o laboratório como duplo. Esse laboratório duplo serve como forma de investigar a si mesmo; ele se coloca de forma analítica como laboratório de um laboratório. É importante estabelecer uma conexão entre todos esses projetos. Assim, a abordagem que se faz, uma experiência, torna-se nossa prioridade no sentido de encher este laboratório com experiências a ser realizadas. Nosso objetivo é tentar encontrar um modo de produzir algo juntos que não seja arte nem ciência, mas que tenha um interesse em comum; que nos faça produzir esta coisa.

Esses processos são importantes, pois a partir do momento em que falamos sobre o laboratório estamos falando sobre o processo. É necessário discutir primeiro o laboratório, não um elemento em particular. Carsten Höller disse uma coisa muito importante. É o mesmo que afirmar que encontraremos uma forma de apresentação pública de elementos que até aqui eram mantidos no âmbito particular. Nem todo mundo faz inaugurações públicas como Luc Steels. Normalmente, o laboratório serve para esconder os erros cometidos; apenas os resultados são apresentados. Essa noção de espaço fechado também vale para o ateliê. Desde o início do século 18, o laboratório sempre foi um local privado, ainda que seja “oficialmente” financiado por dinheiro público. Penso que a decisão original de sistematizar toda a operação na forma de um laboratorium tem a ver com a tentativa de reencontrar uma ligação entre os espaços público e privado. Portanto, esse espaço é relativamente perigoso. De alguma forma, poderemos estar na cozinha desse laboratório. A experiência do Luc poderá ser malsucedida, ou ainda é possível que os Talking Heads não consigam andar. São riscos que devemos aceitar. Da mesma forma que as experiências do Luc Steels talvez não dêem certo. Na única vez que visitei a Documenta, os porcos (...) estavam em greve, eu não os vi, estava fechado para o público. Isso, no que tange ao processo de laboratório, implica a reabertura pública de uma discussão privada. Se estamos mais uma vez interessados no laboratório, é porque estamos querendo expandir nosso tempo, em vez de prolongarmos um tempo de cientifismo exasperado. Queremos compreender de que forma o laboratório acontece e oferecer nossas observações críticas. Como foi publicado no Le Monde, começaram a gerar bovinos que são produtos híbridos de bovinos e humanos, com o objetivo de obter órgãos humanos. Talvez possamos até aceitar isso, embora a experiência envolva um aspecto moral muito importante. Ainda assim, gostaríamos de saber de que maneira os cientistas chegaram a esses híbridos. Seria uma pena deixarmos de apresentar algo contemporâneo, quer dizer, uma exposição hi-tech, hipermoderna ou pós-moderna. Já estamos num outro tempo, o tempo da recuperação, da reapropriação política (no sentido mais amplo do termo, no sentido político e não necessariamente dramático. Já citei como exemplos o porto de Antuérpia, o câncer de mama ou a soja contaminada, ou ainda o clima de Buenos Aires). Isso nos dá uma sensação deste tempo. Teríamos um atraso imenso caso nos ativéssemos simplesmente à comparação dos efeitos. Agora são as questões de reapropriação que não podemos mais aceitar na relação pedagógica. Não podemos mais nos relacionar com a ciência de modo pedagógico. Nesse sentido, L'âme et le corps ainda é uma exposição pedagógica. Que mudanças o fim das relações pedagógicas trazem para o contexto? Sistematizar o laboratorium é muito bom. É como dizer: "Não estamos tentando lhes ensinar coisas que vocês já sabem. No caso do Luc, por exemplo, vocês são convidados a assistir, por trás dos especialistas, eles colocarem em prática experiências que podem ser malsucedidas". Isso não é a mesma coisa que dizer: "Você trabalha no laboratório, comete todo tipo de erro, e agora nós os expomos da maneira mais charmosa e engraçada”.

LS: Do ponto de vista científico, eu gostaria de mencionar que em nossa última conversa abordamos alguns pontos muito importantes. Em primeiro lugar, há a idéia de experiência, de laboratorium que precisa ser divulgada para as pessoas. Não me refiro a uma comunicação explícita, mas à experiência em si. Ao formularmos a pergunta: "Qual o motivo de fazermos uma experiência?", estamos criando uma realidade, levantando questões etc. Isso significa que as pessoas se dedicam a algum tipo de atividade científica e sabemos que há um grande número de pessoas que constróem modelos, mas elas não fazem experiências nem têm laboratórios. Acho importante encontrarmos experiências. Além disso, não é necessário que todos os campos da ciência estejam representados aqui. Se houver seis, já é o bastante.

Os livros de Bruno ou de Isabelle Stengers trazem descrições claras das experiências de Pasteur. O que é também muito importante, conforme Carsten Höller mencionou, é saber por que fazemos isso em público: será que ficamos olhando assim com olho de peixe morto, ou há algum tipo de interação? Por um lado, nosso objetivo é promover uma experiência; por outro, é observar a reação das pessoas. Isso significa que devemos introduzir muito mais interatividade na experiência, para depois perguntarmos aos participantes se ocorreram fenômenos cognitivos. Para nós, não se trata apenas de expor uma experiência. Há também o público, há todo um processo de interação, e, ao final dos três meses, serão publicados trabalhos científicos sobre as interações das pessoas com essas entidades.

BL: Trata-se da primeira vez que a relação público-privado será rearticulada de forma diferente daquela observada no Palais de la Découverte, para dar um exemplo francês. Não se trata de uma comunicação um tanto superficial de efeitos satisfatórios, não se trata de estética.

A palavra ‘laboratório’ remete em primeiro lugar à alquimia. No início, era um espaço muito privado que aos poucos se tornou mais aberto a especialistas do sexo masculino, escolhidos a dedo. Mais tarde, tornou-se o espaço onde se comete todo tipo de erro, mas que, de maneira geral, permanece completamente escondido. Luc está falando sobre um assunto de todo contemporâneo: o laboratório que se torna público, ou se abre aos olhos do público, é coerente com outro laboratório em escala 1: a experiência coletiva que na qual todos participamos, com inteligência compartilhada: o aquecimento global. O motivo pelo qual estamos mais uma vez interessados no laboratório não é estético. Estamos num laboratório de escala 1. Antuérpia é um laboratório em escala 1.

Falar sobre um laboratorium implica um conjunto de especificações. Quem são os artistas, quem são os cientistas capazes de reestabelecer uma conexão com o público? Isso vai contra a autonomia do artista – foram necessários três séculos para o artista se tornar autônomo, dois séculos para o cientista se tornar autônomo. Hoje ninguém mais está interessado no cientista autônomo. O cientista autônomo passou a ser um inimigo, tanto do ponto de vista político como científico. O cientista autônomo não produz nada mais de interessante, ele é comprado, e o artista autônomo está morto... ou quase.

Não estamos interessados em expor um cenário. Isso já foi feito milhares de vezes. É voyeurismo. Agora se trata de risco, pois por um lado a experiência pode fracassar; por outro, temos de ampliar o contato com o público. Assim, o laboratório se transforma no espaço que difere da divisão convencional em público e privado. É mais delicado, porém mais interessante. O fato é que não estamos mais numa época em que o artista ou cientista autônomo e privado são considerados pessoas interessantes. Ao contrário, a pessoa que se volta para o laboratório – artista ou cientista, não importa – precisa de um público que não seja espectador nem que receba informações de maneira pedagógica. Isso é que é interessante. Isso é o laboratorium.

O problema é a comunicação com os outros. Em biologia, biologia médica, fazer uma experiência que envolve pessoas é quase uma necessidade. Por exemplo, pode-se utilizar produtos ou injeções... um teste que muda o comportamento da população...

CH: Estou pensando sobre a experiência da ressaca que propus da última vez. Bebi bastante ontem para ver o que aconteceria se eu chegasse aqui de ressaca. Não deu muito certo, eu precisava ter bebido mais. Falamos pouco sobre o elemento da dúvida. O laboratório também é algo sobre o qual precisamos ter dúvidas. Por que deveríamos escolher entre dois caminhos? Por que não nos situarmos entre eles? A dúvida nos paralisa. Será que laboratório é realmente necessário? Será necessário fazer experiências científicas? Será que precisamos produzir arte? Para quê? Uma vez que não podemos encontrar uma solução, temos de trazer essa idéia do laboratório da dúvida. Como não podemos destruir o laboratório, deveremos apresentar o laboratório da dúvida.

LS: A dúvida é extremamente importante. Parte da razão para fazermos a experiência em público é convencer as pessoas de alguma coisa. O ideal é chegarmos com uma atitude contrária ao que queremos mostrar. Acho que é por isso que fazemos experiências. Com os Talking Heads podemos escrever trabalhos, desenvolver teorias, séculos de teoria sobre a linguagem. Mas é singular o fato de poder, de algum modo, concretizar a teoria, portanto isso muda tudo. Muda o grau de convencimento das pessoas que estão assistindo. As melhores experiências são feitas com indivíduos que mudam radicalmente de opinião, ou que têm dúvidas sobre essa possibilidade. A experiência poderia mudar a opinião ou percepção deles. Há um critério que me parece muito importante na escolha das atividades: o processo não basta, é necessário haver dúvidas, opiniões divergentes que emergem na discussão, a experiência precisa agilizar algumas coisas.

LS: Ao final de todas essas experiências, a pergunta a ser feita do lado científico é a seguinte: Será que isso mudou a opinião das pessoas? Colocamos as questões na mesa, e isso mudou a opinião das pessoas?

CH: É necessário questionar todos esses elementos progressistas do laboratório. A dúvida é necessária. Precisamos ver o que é possível fazer, mas ao mesmo tempo nos perguntamos: será realmente necessário fazer o possível? Na verdade, não seria melhor deixar as coisas de lado, sem chegar a resultado algum? Talvez o resultado seja apenas um atenuante... Não seria melhor permanecer num estado de pré- ou pós- resultado?

BL: Um ascetismo de algum tipo, o laboratório ascético. É uma boa idéia termos o caráter ascético de um laboratório onde não se aprende nada... Temos de deixar essa questão em aberto, pois da maneira como Luc Steels a apresenta ela poderia implicar um laboratório pasteuriano. Nossa experiência pública deve ser um laboratório público que convence massivamente, que convence as massas. Nossa perspectiva é relativamente moderna, modernista e progressista. Em vez de implantá-la em pequena escala num local isolado, podemos estabelecê-la em grande escala, é Bouilly-Lefort com Pasteur, convertemos a França inteira em experiência pública. Como Arquimedes. Mais ainda, seria interessante pedir que Peter Gallison apresente uma palestra sobre grandes experiências públicas. Mas aquilo que Carsten Höller diz também é outra coisa. O laboratório poderia tornar-se um meio cultural novo e refinado, pelo qual podemos nos confrontar com grandes problemas dentro desse laboratório em escala natural, ou seja, o mundo em que vivemos. Seria uma experiência, até mesmo uma experiência religiosa, ao menos no sentido do suspense. Zen... você fala sobre um laboratório zen. Trata-se de um laboratório equipado com muitas máquinas, mas onde o indivíduo permanece em suspensão...

CH: O que ele disse a respeito de mudar de opinião não significa que todas as pessoas tenham opiniões diferentes. O fato de uma opinião mudar indica a possibilidade de cada indivíduo ter opinião diferente. É isso que acho interessante: não há nenhum resultado, no sentido de que há certa verdade e ainda assim o resultado produz em si mesmo uma verdade inversa, que é o contra-resultado, e isso vai mais longe. Acontece entre dois pólos. A idéia por trás disso é sempre a mudança de paradigma (inicialmente se acreditava nisso, depois se acreditava naquilo). Foi assim que o progresso científico veio a acontecer. Mas seria bom tentarmos descobrir, pois não há verdade em si mesma...

LS: Isso é o começo de uma discussão mais profunda.


< a ser acrescentado à pré-estréia da Book Machine>

Book Machine [Máquina de Livro]
Por Bruce Mau

As duas aspirações básicas de nosso projeto, Book Machine, eram fazer dele um laboratório de trabalho e demonstrar a vitalidade do livro, tratando simplesmente sua produção como uma performance em tempo real.

A definição tradicional de "livro" criou um tipo de profecia de auto-realização em que as pessoas continuam a produzir livros destinados a enterrar o material. Vejo a confecção de um livro como um processo de desenvolvimento, que continua a cada leitura. Não se trata de um processo finito.

Empreendemos com Book Machine é uma experiência de tradução. Para mudar de uma forma para outra, o material tem de passar por uma espécie de filtro de tradução, que pode ser um processo de clarificação e intensificação, ou o contrário. De alguma maneira, é necessário fazer que os conceitos, as formas, os acontecimentos e a composição de um meio falem com e através de outro.

Book Machine é um volumoso projeto de captura, documentação e catalogação sistematizada que foi mostrado em Antuérpia como performance de impressão em tempo real, rastreando e interpretando um processo de exposição e seus resíduos durante um período de quatro meses. De junho a outubro de 1999, Book Machine (realizado com dois computadores Macintosh, dois scanners, uma impressora em cores e dois assistentes), funcionou na sede da exposição no Museu de Fotografia de Antuérpia.

Pensamos nas pessoas envolvidas no Book Machine como o filtro. Sua tarefa era captar uma variedade de eventos aleatórios, passá-los para o livro através de um prisma e torná-los significativos num contexto discursivo juntamente com outros materiais.


Book Machine foi um trabalho em andamento que permitiu a convergência do conteúdo e do contexto do processo do catálogo-publicação. O catálogo tornou-se performático. À medida que cada página saía da Book Machine era montada na parede, começando no canto superior esquerdo da sala e continuando por todas as paredes em fileiras horizontais. O processo de design foi implantado como um laboratório. Nos dois primeiros dias da exposição Laboratorium, Book Machine produziu mais de 300 páginas duplas. Ao final de três meses havia processado seis mil imagens e quase 18,5 milhões de caracteres de texto.

Manual Book Machine: conjunto de instruções e equipamento para produzir o catálogo para o Laboratorium.


Equipamento

Dois computadores Macintosh G3, cada um com disco rígido de 4Gb e 120Mb de memória RAM. Software: aplicativos gráficos e fontes; correio eletrônico e linha ISDN; uma impressora em cores, dois scanners horizontais, com capacidade para escanear transparências. Um Zip drive, uma mesa, duas cadeiras, duas luminárias, um arquivo com fechadura, rede Ethernet, um gravador de CD.


Pessoal

Dois assistentes trabalhando no local. A função dos assistentes é comparável à de um colorista, ou seja, alguém que preenche de cor os contornos fornecidos. Eles podem fazê-lo de uma forma organizada ou podem ser arbitrários, extrapolando as linhas.


Dois projetistas no BMD

O papel dos projetistas é montar a estrutura, criando uma listagem de instruções e técnicas a ser usadas na produção do trabalho.

Procedimento

Estabelecer forma e conteúdo
O Laboratorium será a principal fonte de conteúdo para esse exercício, fornecendo forma e morfologia para a Book Machine.

Reunir o material
Fotografar, fazer gravações, produzir fitas de vídeo, transcrever, download, navegar na Internet, registrar dados, visualizar informações, montar gráficos, visitar instalações, conversar, fazer perguntas, solicitar material de diferentes fontes.

Começar com a página dupla
Pense na página dupla como um espaço, e em cada página simples como uma unidade da dupla.
Defina as dimensões da página. O número de páginas é ilimitado.

Inserir a grade
A grade é a consistência estrutural por debaixo da superfície do livro, é onde tudo se deverá encaixar-se. A área de texto e a página devem ter sempre as mesmas proporções. Em seu maior formato, a área de texto deve ter como exemplo a regra de ouro que Jan Tschichold desenhou em 1953: a margem interna mede um nono da largura da página; a margem externa mede dois nonos da largura da página; a margem superior mede um nono da altura da página e a margem inferior é dois nonos da altura da página. Dependendo do comprimento desejado para o texto final, a caixa de texto pode encolher no sentido de uma linha diagonal desenhada a partir do canto superior interno da página para o canto externo inferior. O canto interno superior da caixa de texto permanece constante em sua posição e o canto externo inferior move-se para cima e para baixo, na diagonal. Se a área de texto é muito pequena, um texto curto pode também ser produzido para preencher várias páginas.

Selecionar as imagens associadas
As representações dos trabalhos dos artistas não devem ser recortadas ou alteradas. Use a totalidade da dimensão horizontal ou vertical da página, dependendo da orientação da imagem. O restante da página é deixado em branco. Imagens de instalação são infinitamente flexíveis e podem ser recortadas, manipuladas e tratadas conforme necessário.


Aplicar os padrões e máscaras apropriados
Os padrões definem a posição do conteúdo dentro das páginas duplas. As máscaras controlam o grau de exposição deste conteúdo. (Por exemplo, uma máscara é 70% opaca, assim apenas 30% do conteúdo é exposto.)

Especificar a tipografia
Toda tipografia deve estar de acordo com as regras de composição e especificações tipográficas definidas em cada descrição elaborada do padrão.


Criar um circuito de realimentação (feedback)
Processar o conteúdo através de vários filtros. São filtros: crítico, colaborador, comentarista, colega, analista, curador, editor, transeunte, visitante da exposição. Capturar e incorporar a resposta do filtro para a peça. Este fluxo de informação permite a hibridização de sistemas, deflagra conflitos e transforma e amplifica o conteúdo.


Padrões

À medida que novas formas de conteúdo são identificadas e não podem ser acomodadas pelos padrões existentes, novos padrões devem ser criados e registrados. Entre eles devem estar:

Ensaios
Leia o ensaio. Determine os assuntos ou temas mais importantes do texto e encontre imagens correlatas. O texto é sempre inserido na página ímpar. As imagens são sempre colocadas na página par. Todas as imagens precisam de uma legenda. As legendas ficam posicionadas diretamente abaixo das imagens e são ordenadas de tal forma que o leitor possa intuir quais legendas se referem a qual imagem. Os tipos usados para composição de notas e excertos são sempre um ponto menor dos que aqueles usados para o corpo do texto. A primeira linha de cada nota é indentada. A indentação é sempre igual à do texto de condução.

Propostas de projeto
Leia a proposta. Determine os temas mais importantes do texto e encontre imagens relacionadas a eles. Essas páginas têm duas áreas vivas: a menor para texto e a maior para imagens e legendas. Componha o texto nas páginas e posicione as imagens de maneira relevante para o texto. Ao menos um lado de cada imagem deve tangenciar a margem da área destinada para ilustração. Todas as imagens devem ter legenda. As legendas são inseridas diretamente abaixo da imagem correspondente.

Anotações e registros da experiência
Organize em ordem cronológica todas as anotações e registros, codificando-os segundo um sistema numérico (horário, dia ou ordem de ocorrência). Organize cada registro com sua respectiva ilustração inserida diretamente abaixo do título do registro. O tamanho da imagem deve ser ajustado para corresponder à largura da coluna. Toda informação sobre a imagem deve ser incluída no início do registro.

Palestras com slides
Assista à palestra ou ao vídeo dela. Faça uma pergunta. Certifique-se de que os textos foram transcritos e traduzidos. Reúna as imagens mais importantes. Organize-as em ordem cronológica e junte-as aos textos associados a elas. As imagens e seus textos devem ser diagramados como páginas de histórias em quadrinhos. As imagens são dispostas à razão de quatro a seis por página, em grade ortogonal. O texto é sempre colocado diretamente abaixo de cada slide. Todas as ilustrações devem ser acompanhadas de texto ou legenda.

Palestras sem imagens
Assista à palestra ou ao vídeo dela. Faça uma pergunta. Certifique-se de que os textos foram transcritos e traduzidos. Escaneie as declarações e excertos mais importantes ou interessantes do texto. Organize os excertos em ordem cronológica e disponha-os na página da esquerda de cada página dupla. O texto da palestra é diagramado de forma a correr em colunas cheias nas páginas ímpares.

Entrevistas
Leia a entrevista. Determine os temas mais significativos da entrevista e procure imagens que sejam relevantes ou que evoquem essas idéias. Cada voz na entrevista tem sua própria tipologia. Todas as páginas pares contêm texto e todas as páginas ímpares, ilustrações sangradas.

Gráficos e diagramas em destaque
Reúna o máximo possível de dados quantitativos e qualitativos relacionados a todo o trabalho. Determine a representação gráfica mais clara dos dados. Gráficos tridimensionais são preferíveis.

Experiências de mesa
Assista a cada vídeo de performance. Escolha quadros que representam gestos animados, técnicas variadas de demonstração e uso simultâneo de recursos multimídia. Associe cada imagem à seção apropriada do texto. Cada imagem necessita de um texto, e você precisa de imagens suficientes para ilustrar todos os textos.

Layout com excesso de colunas
Alguns conteúdos precisam ser dispostos em colunas estreitas. Crie páginas com muitas colunas para ampliar o aspecto denso do material. Algumas páginas podem ter mais de dez colunas verticais, e o conteúdo pode ser disposto em tipos bastante pequenos, mas ainda assim legíveis. Use as Páginas Amarelas da cidade como modelo.

Imagens como sementes
Algumas contribuições têm diversas imagens de referência. Para acomodar essas grandes quantidades, as imagens podem ser reproduzidas em tamanhos bem reduzidos, como sementes, dispersas por todo o corpo do texto.

Ensaios de imagens nos cantos
Os ensaios de imagens podem ser aplicados às páginas duplas, colocando-se uma ilustração em cada um dos quatro cantos. As imagens não devem ser cortadas e devem ser produzidas no maior formato possível, sem que no entanto se sobreponham.


Ensaios simultâneos de imagens
Uma série de imagens pode ser iniciada dentro de um segundo ensaio de imagens. Nesse caso, a primeira série é formatada em páginas duplas e ilustrações sangradas. Perto da metade desta seqüência de ilustrações, a primeira imagem da segunda série deve aparecer como uma figura pequena no canto inferior direito da página. Depois deste ponto, cada página subseqüente tem uma imagem da segunda seqüência nesta mesma locação. Uma vez concluída a primeira seqüência de imagens, a segunda seqüência continua a ser disposta nessa posição de canto até que seja finalizada. Esta segunda série também pode tornar-se progressivamente maior até ultrapassar primeira seqüência, tornando-se ao final tão grande quanto a página inteira.

Legendas grandes
Inverta a habitual relação imagem-legenda. Alguns projetos podem ser feitos com pequenas imagens e grandes legendas. Neste caso, cada ilustração é colocada no centro exato da página, perpendicular à canaleta. O tamanho da imagem deve também deixar espaço para uma coluna de texto e para a legenda, anexado ao lado direito da imagem. A caixa de texto da legenda começa exatamente na metade inferior do lado direito da imagem, e é igual a duas vezes a largura da imagem.
Essas proporções são constantes, mesmo que o tamanho da imagem se altere.


MÁSCARAS

No momento trabalhamos com quatro máscaras. Este número pode ser expandido.

Perfurações graduadas
Esta máscara é constituída por círculos opacos, graduados. Todos os centros dos círculos estão numa grade constante, mas os tamanhos dos círculos aumentam, de meros pontos numa grande área no lado mais distante da máscara para as esferas grandes e opacas que tocam todas as quatro intersecções de eixos, de modo que sobra um espaço mínimo entre eles.

Grampos
Esta máscara é feita de grampos triangulares, estreitos e longos, com margens tangenciando uma extremidade e pontos que se afinam em direção ao lado mais externo da máscara a fim de revelar uma imagem do espaço para além do qual está a sua forma espelhada.

Espaços macios
Esta máscara é uma série de elipses de bordas macias que agem como orifícios que levam a um espaço além.

Perfuração
Esta máscara é uma grade regular de orifícios circulares, perfurados por toda a superfície da página. Todos os orifícios são do mesmo tamanho, e o espaço entre eles é igual a seu diâmetro.

Traduzido do Inglês por Izabel Murat Burbridge



The two underlying ambitions of our project, Book Machine, were to make the project itself a working laboratory, and to demonstrate the book s vitality simply by treating the production of a book as a real-time performance. The traditional definition of "book" has created a kind of self-fulfilling prophecy in which people continue to produce books that are meant to entomb the material. I see bookmaking as a process of rolling forward, a process that continues its momentum with every reading. It is not something that stops.
The experiment we undertook with Book Machine is one of translation. To move from one form to another the material has to pass through a kind of translation filter. This can be a process of clarification and intensification, or its opposite. Somehow, one has to make the concepts, the forms, the events, and the drama of one medium speak in and through another.

Book Machine is a massive documentation-capture project and cataloging system that was shown as a real-time print performance in Antwerp, tracking and interpreting an exhibition process and its residue over a period of four months. From June to October 1999, Book Machine (comprising two Macintosh computers, two scanners, a color printer, and two assistants), operated within the exhibition s headquarters at Antwerp s Museum of Photography. We thought of the people involved in the Book Machine as the filter. Their task was to capture a variety of wild events and pass them through a prism and into the book, and to make these events meaningful in a discursive context with all the other material.

Book Machine was an ongoing project that allowed the content and context of the catalog-publication process to converge. The catalog became performative. As each page came through the Book Machine it was mounted on the wall, starting at the top left-hand corner of its venue and continuing across all the walls in rows. The design process was implemented as a laboratory. In the first two days of the Laboratorium exhibition Book Machine produced over three hundred spreads. By the end of three months it had processed six thousand images and almost 18,500,000 characters of text.


The Book Machine Manual
A set of instructions and equipment to produce the catalog for Laboratorium.

Equipment

2 Macintosh G3 computers,
each with a 4G hard drive, 120MB of RAM
Software: graphics applications and fonts
E-mail and ISDN line
1 color printer
2 flatbed scanners, with ability to scan transparencies
1 Zip drive
1 table
2 chairs
2 table lamps
1 filing cabinet with lock
Ethernet network
1 CD burner

Staff
Two assistants on site. The function of the assistants is comparable to that of a colorist, someone who fills in color where outlines are given. They may do this in an organized way or they may be arbitrary, moving outside the lines.

Two designers at BMD. The role of the designers is to provide structure by creating the list of instructions and techniques to be used in the production of the work.

Procedure
1. Establish form and content.
Laboratorium will be the main source of content for this exercise, providing form and morphology to the Book Machine.
2. Collect material.
Photograph, record, videotape, transcribe, download, surf Web sites, record data, visualize information, make graphs, visit installations, talk, ask questions, transmit calls for submissions.
3. Start with the spread (two facing pages laid open).
Think of the spread as a space, and of the page as a unit within the spread. Define the page dimensions. The number of pages is unlimited.
4. Insert the grid.
The grid is a structural consistency beneath the surface of the book. Everything will "snap" to the grid. The text area and the page must always have the same proportions. At its largest, the text area will follow the golden canon of Jan Tschichold, drawn in 1953: the inner margin is one-ninth the page width; the outer margin is two-ninths the page width; the top margin is one-ninth the page height; and the bottom margin is two-ninths the page height. Depending on the desired length of the finished text piece, the text box can shrink along a diagonal line drawn from the top inner corner of the page down to the outer bottom corner. The top inner corner of the text box remains constant in its position and the bottom outer corner moves up and down the diagonal. If the text area is very small, a short text can thus be made to fill many pages.
5. Select the associated images.
Representations of artists works must not be cropped or altered. Use a full horizontal or full vertical dimension of the page, depending on the orientation of the image. The rest of the page is left blank. Situation images are infinitely flexible and can be cropped, manipulated, and treated as required.
6. Apply the appropriate templates and masks.
Templates define the position of content within the spreads. Masks control the degree of expression of this content. (For example, a particular mask is 70 percent opaque and therefore only 30 percent of the content is expressed.)
7. Specify typography.
All typography will conform to the composition rules and typographic specifications outlined in each elaborated template description.
8. Create feedback loop.
Process the content through various filters. The filter can be any of the following: critic, collaborator, commentator, peer, analyst, curator, editor, a person off the street, a visitor to the exhibit. Capture and incorporate the response from the filter into the piece. This information flow allows for the crossbreeding of systems, triggers conflict, and transforms and amplifies the content.

Templates
As new forms of content are identified that cannot be accommodated by the existing templates, new templates must be created and recorded. Among them might be:

1. Essays
Read the essay. Determine the most important themes/subjects of the text
and find related images. The text is always inserted on the right-hand page. Images are always placed on the left-hand page. All images require a caption. Captions occur directly under the images and are arranged such that the reader can intuit which captions refer to which image. Notes and extracts are always set one point smaller than the body text. First line of each note is indented. Indentation is always equal to the leading.

2. Project proposals
Read the proposal. Determine the most important themes of the text and find images related to them. These pages have two live areas, a smaller one for the text and a larger one for the images and their captions. Run the text through the pages and insert the images into a position where they are relevant to the text. At least one edge of each image should be touching this image area margin. All images require a caption. Captions occur directly below the image.

3. Notes and experiment logs
Organize all notes and logbook entries chronologically and code them with a numeric system (by time, by date, or by order of occurrence). Organize each entry with its respective images inserted directly below the entry title. The image should be sized to the full column width. Any information about the image should be included at the beginning of the entry.

4. Lectures with slides
Attend the lecture or watch the lecture video. Ask one question. Ensure that texts are transcribed and translated. Collect the most important images. Organize images in chronological order and pair them with their associated texts. The images and their texts are organized like the pages of a comic book. The images are arranged in an orthogonal grid, with four to six images per page. The text always occurs directly below each slide image. All images require a text or caption.

5. Lectures without images
Attend the lecture or watch the lecture video. Ask one question. Ensure that texts are transcribed and translated. Scan the text for the most important, or most interesting, statements and extracts. Organize extracts in chronological order and place them on the left-hand page of each spread. The lecture text flows in its complete form on the right-hand pages of the spread.

6. Interview
Read the interview. Determine the most significant themes of the interview and find images that are relevant to or evocative of these ideas. Each voice in the conversation gets its own typeface. Every left-hand page carries text and every right-hand page carries a full bleed image.

7. Emphasized charts and diagrams
Collect as much quantitative and qualitative data as possible related to all the work. Determine the clearest graphic representation of the data. Three-dimensional graphics are preferred.

8. Tabletop experiments
Watch each performance video. Select stills that represent animated gestures, varied demonstration techniques, and simultaneous use of multiple presentation media. Link each image to the appropriate section of text. Every image needs text, and you need enough images to illustrate all the texts.

9. The overcolumned layout
Some content will need to be displayed in narrow columns. Create pages with too many columns to amplify the dense nature of the material. Some pages could have up to ten vertical columns, and the content can be set in very small but still legible type. Use the city Yellow Pages as a model.

10. Images as seeds
Some contributions have many reference images. To accommodate such large quantities, images can be reproduced in very tiny sizes, as seeds, dispersed throughout the body of the text.

11. Snap-to-corners image essays
Image essays can be applied to the spreads by placing an image at each of the four corners of the spread. The images should not be cropped and they should be made as large as possible without allowing them to overlap.

12. Simultaneous image essays
One series of images can commence within a second image essay. The first series is formatted with full-spread, full-bleed images. Toward the middle of this image sequence, the first image of the second series should occur as a small picture in the bottom right-hand corner of a spread. After this point, every subsequent spread has an image from the second sequence in this same location. Once the first sequence of images is completed, the second sequence keeps on going in this corner location until it ends. This second series of images can also become incrementally larger until it overtakes the first sequence, eventually becoming as large as the whole spread.

13. Big captions
Reverse the usual image-caption relationship. Some works may be made up of small images and big captions. In this case each image is placed in the exact center of the spread across the gutter. The size of the image must also allow space for a column of text and the caption, attached to the right side of the image. The caption text box starts exactly halfway down the right side of the image and is equal to two times the width of the image. These proportions are constant, even as the size of the image changes.

MASKS
There are currently four masks. This number can be expanded.

1. Graduated perforations
This mask is made up of graduated, opaque circles. All the circle centers are on a constant grid, but the circle sizes gradually increase, from mere specs in a large field of space on the far side of the mask, to large opaque spheres that touch at all four axis points so that there is a minimum amount of space between them.

2. Spikes
This mask is made up of long, narrow triangular spikes with abutting edges at one end and points that taper to the far side of the mask to reveal an image of the space beyond which is the inverse shape of the mask.

3. Soft Spaces
This mask is a series of soft-edged ellipses that act as holes leading to a space beyond.

4. Perforation
This mask is a regularized grid of circular holes punched through the surface of the spread. All the holes are the same size, and the space between them is equal to their diameter.

* * *

Mudanças o fim das relações pedagógicas trazem para o contexto? Sistematizar o laboratorium é muito bom. É como dizer: “Não estamos tentando lhes ensinar coisas que vocês já sabem. No caso do Luc, por exemplo, vocês são convidados a assistir, por trás dos especialistas, eles colocarem em prática experiências que podem ser malsucedidas”. Isso não é a mesma coisa que dizer: “Você trabalha no laboratório, comete todo tipo de erro, e agora nós os expomos da maneira mais charmosa e engraçada”.
Luc Steels: Do ponto de vista científico, eu gostaria de mencionar que em nossa última conversa abordamos alguns pontos muito importantes. Em primeiro lugar, há a idéia de experiência, de laboratorium que precisa ser divulgada para as pessoas. Não me refiro a uma comunicação explícita, mas à experiência em si. Ao formularmos a pergunta: “Qual o motivo de fazermos uma experiência?”, estamos criando uma realidade, levantando questões etc. Isso significa que as pessoas se dedicam a algum tipo de atividade científica e sabemos que há um grande número de pessoas que constróem modelos, mas elas não fazem experiências nem têm laboratórios. Acho importante encontrarmos experiências. Além disso, não é necessário que todos os campos da ciência estejam representados aqui. Se houver seis, já é o bastante.
Os livros de Bruno ou de Isabelle Stengers trazem descrições claras das experiências de Pasteur. O que é também muito importante, conforme Carsten Höller mencionou, é saber por que fazemos isso em público: será que ficamos olhando assim com olho de peixe morto, ou há algum tipo de interação? Por um lado, nosso objetivo é promover uma experiência; por outro, é observar a reação das pessoas. Isso significa que devemos introduzir muito mais interatividade na experiência, para depois perguntarmos aos participantes se ocorreram fenômenos cognitivos. Para nós, não se trata apenas de expor uma experiência. Há tam bém o público, há todo um processo de interação, e, ao final dos três meses, serão publicados trabalhos científicos sobre as interações das pessoas com essas entidades.
Bruno Latour: Trata-se da primeira vez que a relação público-privado será rearticulada de forma diferente daquela observada no Palais de la Découverte, para dar um exemplo francês. Não se trata de uma comunicação um tanto superficial de efeitos satisfatórios, não se trata de estética.
A palavra ‘laboratório’ remete em primeiro lugar à alquimia. No início, era um espaço muito privado que aos poucos se tornou mais aberto a especialistas do sexo masculino, escolhidos a dedo. Mais tarde, tornou-se o espaço onde se comete todo tipo de erro, mas que, de maneira geral, permanece completamente escondido. Luc está falando sobre um assunto de todo contemporâneo: o laboratório que se torna público, ou se abre aos olhos do público, é coerente com outro laboratório em escala 1: a experiência coletiva que na qual todos participamos, com inteligência compartilhada: o aquecimento global. O motivo pelo qual estamos mais uma vez interessados no laboratório não é estético. Estamos num laboratório de escala 1. Antuérpia é um laboratório em escala 1.
Falar sobre um laboratorium implica um conjunto de especificações. Quem são os artistas, quem são os cientistas capazes de reestabelecer uma conexão com o público? Isso vai contra a autonomia do artista–foram necessários três séculos para o artista se tornar autônomo, dois séculos para o cientista se tornar autônomo. Hoje ninguém mais está interessado no cientista autônomo. O cientista autônomo passou a ser um inimigo, tanto do ponto de vista político como científico. O cientista autônomo não produz nada mais de interessante, ele é comprado, e o artista autônomo está morto... ou quase.
Não estamos interessados em expor um cenário. Isso já foi feito milhares de vezes. É voyeurismo. Agora se trata de risco, pois por um lado a experiência pode fracassar; por outro, temos de ampliar o contato com o público. Assim, o laboratório se transforma no espaço que difere da divisão convencional em público e privado. É mais delicado, porém mais interessante. O fato é que não estamos mais numa época em que o artista ou cientista autônomo e privado são considerados pessoas interessantes. Ao contrário, a pessoa que se volta para o laboratório–artista ou cientista, não importa–precisa de um público que não seja espectador nem que receba informações de maneira pedagógica. Isso é que é interessante. Isso é o laboratorium.
O problema é a comunicação com os outros. Em biologia, biologia médica, fazer uma experiência que envolve pessoas é quase uma necessidade. Por exemplo, pode-se utilizar produtos ou injeções... um teste que muda o comportamento da população...
Carsten Höller: Estou pensando sobre a experiência da ressaca que propus da última vez. Bebi bastante ontem para ver o que aconteceria se eu chegasse aqui de ressaca. Não deu muito certo, eu precisava ter bebido mais. Falamos pouco sobre o elemento da dúvida. O laboratório também é algo sobre o qual precisamos ter dúvidas. Por que deveríamos escolher entre dois caminhos? Por que não nos situarmos entre eles? A dúvida nos paralisa. Será que laboratório é realmente necessário? Será necessário fazer experiências científicas? Será que precisamos produzir arte? Para quê? Uma vez que não podemos encontrar uma solução, temos de trazer essa idéia do laboratório da dúvida. Como não podemos destruir o laboratório, deveremos apresentar o laboratório da dúvida.
Luc Steels: A dúvida é extremamente importante. Parte da razão para fazermos a experiência em público é convencer as pessoas de alguma coisa. O ideal é chegarmos com uma atitude contrária ao que queremos mostrar. Acho que é por isso que fazemos experiências. Com os Talking Heads podemos escrever trabalhos, desenvolver teorias, séculos de teoria sobre a linguagem. Mas é singular o fato de poder, de algum modo, concretizar a teoria, portanto isso muda tudo. Muda o grau de convencimento das pessoas que estão assistindo. As melhores experiências são feitas com indivíduos que mudam radicalmente de opinião, ou que têm dúvidas sobre essa possibilidade. A experiência poderia mudar a opinião ou percepção deles. Há um critério que me parece muito importante na escolha das atividades: o processo não basta, é necessário haver dúvidas, opiniões divergentes que emergem na discussão, a experiência precisa agilizar algumas coisas.
Luc Steels: Ao final de todas essas experiências, a pergunta a ser feita do lado científico é a seguinte: Será que isso mudou a opinião das pessoas? Colocamos as questões na mesa, e isso mudou a opinião das pessoas?
Carsten Höller: É necessário questionar todos esses elementos progressistas do laboratório. A dúvida é necessária. Precisamos ver o que é possível fazer, mas ao mesmo tempo nos perguntamos: será realmente necessário fazer o possível? Na verdade, não seria melhor deixar as coisas de lado, sem chegar a resultado algum? Talvez o resultado seja apenas um atenuante... Não seria melhor permanecer num estado de pré- ou pós- resultado?
Bruno Latour: Um ascetismo de algum tipo, o laboratório ascético. É uma boa idéia termos o caráter ascético de um laboratório onde não se aprende nada... Temos de deixar essa questão em aberto, pois da maneira como Luc Steels a apresenta ela poderia implicar um laboratório pasteuriano. Nossa experiência pública deve ser um laboratório público que convence massivamente, que convence as massas. Nossa perspectiva é relativamente moderna, modernista e progressista. Em vez de implantá-la em pequena escala num local isolado, podemos estabelecê-la em grande escala, é Bouilly-Lefort com Pasteur, convertemos a França inteira em experiência pública. Como Arquimedes. Mais ainda, seria interessante pedir que Peter Gallison apresente uma palestra sobre grandes experiências públicas. Mas aquilo que Carsten Höller diz também é outra coisa. O laboratório poderia tornar-se um meio cultural novo e refinado, pelo qual podemos nos confrontar com grandes problemas dentro desse laboratório em escala natural, ou seja, o mundo em que vivemos. Seria uma experiência, até mesmo uma experiência religiosa, ao menos no sentido do suspense. Zen... você fala sobre um laboratório zen. Trata-se de um laboratório equipado com muitas máquinas, mas onde o indivíduo permanece em suspensão...
Carsten Höller: O que ele disse a respeito de mudar de opinião não significa que todas as pessoas tenham opiniões diferentes. O fato de uma opinião mudar indica a possibilidade de cada indivíduo ter opinião diferente. É isso que acho interessante: não há nenhum resultado, no sentido de que há certa verdade e ainda assim o resultado produz em si mesmo uma verdade inversa, que é o contra-resultado, e isso vai mais longe. Acontece entre dois pólos. A idéia por trás disso é sempre a mudança de paradigma (inicialmente se acreditava nisso, depois se acreditava naquilo). Foi assim que o progresso científico veio a acontecer. Mas seria bom tentarmos descobrir, pois não há verdade em si mesma...
Luc Steel: Isso é o começo de uma discussão mais profunda.

As duas aspirações básicas de nosso projeto, Book Machine, eram fazer dele um laboratório de trabalho e demonstrar a vitalidade do livro, tratando simplesmente sua produção como uma performance em tempo real.
A definição tradicional de “livro” criou um tipo de profecia de auto-realização em que as pessoas continuam a produzir livros destinados a enterrar o material. Vejo a confecção de um livro como um processo de desenvolvimento, que continua a cada leitura. Não se trata de um processo finito.
Empreendemos com Book Machine é uma experiência de tradução. Para mudar de uma forma para outra, o material tem de passar por uma espécie de filtro de tradução, que pode ser um processo de clarificação e intensificação, ou o contrário. De alguma maneira, é necessário fazer que os conceitos, as formas, os acontecimentos e a composição de um meio falem com e através de outro.
Book Machine é um volumoso projeto de captura, documentação e catalogação sistematizada que foi mostrado em Antuérpia como performance de impressão em tempo real, rastreando e interpretando um processo de exposição e seus resíduos durante um período de quatro meses. De junho a outubro de 1999, Book Machine (realizado com dois computadores Macintosh, dois scanners, uma impressora em cores e dois assistentes), funcionou na sede da exposição no Museu de Fotografia de Antuérpia.
Pensamos nas pessoas envolvidas no Book Machine como o filtro. Sua tarefa era captar uma variedade de eventos aleatórios, passá-los para o livro através de um prisma e torná-los significativos num contexto discursivo juntamente com outros materiais.
Book Machine foi um trabalho em andamento que permitiu a convergência do conteúdo e do contexto do processo do catálogo-publicação. O catálogo tornou-se performático. À medida que cada página saía da Book Machine era montada na parede.

 
Overviews, Views and Reviews
 Studio Visits TRANS>8
Regine Basha on Marcel Dzama/ Regine Basha en Marcel Dzama
by by/por Regine Basha
Landmines in the Gallery: Kendell Geers interviewed by Jérôme Sans/ Minas terrestres en la galería: Kendell Geers entrevistado por Jérôme Sans
by by/por Jérôme Sans
Bettina Funcke: in conversation with John Bock/Bettina Funcke: im Gespräch mit John Bock
by by/von John Bock
Laura Lima: The Artist as Predator/Laura Lima: O Artista como Predator
by by/por Ricardo Basbaum
Damián Ortega: Utility Betrayed
by Itala Schmelz
Carla Arocha
by Wim Peters
Lars Bang Larsen on Jens Haaning/Lars Bang Larsen en Jens Haaning
by by/por Lars Bang Larsen
 Essays TRANS>8
Recent Political Forms Radical Pursuits in Mexico | Formas políticas recientes: búsquedas radicales en México - Santiago Sierra, Francis Alys, Minerva Cuevas
by por Cuauhtemoc Medina
Dangerous Corners | Rincones peligrosos
by por Lia Gangitano
 Double Check TRANS>8
Yvonne Rainer, Continued
by Carrie Lambert
Meyer Vaisman conversation with Hans-Ulrich Obrist
by By: Hans-Ulrich Obrist and Meyer Vaisman
Bettina Funcke's in conversation with John Bock
by John Bock
Mel Chin Conversation with | Una Conversación entre Fareed Armaly and Meta Bauer
by Fareed Armaly and|y Meta Bauer
Anti-postcard | Anti-postal from|desde Caracas. The museum-house | La casa-museo of|de Antonieta Sosa
by Gabriela Rangel M.
 One x One TRANS>8
A Modern Provincial/Un Provinciano Moderno
by by/por Robert Linsley